Rima Salve Makes her Mark in Electrification

Rima Salve, Power Electronics Systems Engineer

When it comes to career enthusiasm, you'll be hard pressed to find someone who's more excited about her prospects. She exudes pure energy as she talks about the future of Cummins - and how she's an integral part of it. 

Rima Salve, Power Electronics Sytems Engineer, rarely says something without punch and purpose, and this time is no exception. 

"I don't like cold places," Rima says, reflecting on her Cummins internship in Minneapolis. "But it was summertime, so it was perfect," she adds. "[My internship] was the first time I had an experience where I was working for someone, but they asked me what my expectations were. That was really something I liked."

This warm welcome at Cummins set the stage for Rima's professional development and upward mobility in the company.


Rima discovers an opportunity in every obstacle.

Moving from India to Indianapolis with a bachelor's degree under her belt, Rima obtained her master's degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from IUPUI in Indianapolis before heading to Minneapolis for her initial Cummins internship. That internship led to an official job in Columbus, Indiana - and an unforeseen obstacle. 

The visa that allowed her to study and work in the United States was about to run out. 

"Throughout the process, my manager and even his manager were all involved in checking on me. That was a big relief to know they were supporting me on that front."

Rima didn't get her visa renewed that year, but that didn't mean she would be left without the job she loved. For nine months, she worked for Cummins in India, and upon her return to Columbus, her job - and a new opportunity - awaited. 


Electrification changes the game

As an electrical engineer, Rima took notice when Cummins debuted Aeos, its first electrified truck. EPBU, the Electrified Power Business Unit, gained more traction and opened up yet another possibility for Rima's career growth. 

Her manager even encouraged her to consider a career change in this new division. With a lot of thought, she eventually made the decision to take on a new, challenging role in EPBU. 

"Our whole team is new. I like that everyone's learning together. It's chaotic, but it's 'nice' chaotic. It's really fun."

For Rima, the chaotic moments also come with benefits. She enjoys a sense of work-life balance, which allows her to find more free time to do what she loves. 

"I have a whole window of time available where I can pursue whatever I want," Rima says.

She can attend "meet and greets" with other Cummins professionals, receives training opportunities, and, perhaps, most importantly, cultivates friendships. 


Culture and career stability keep Rima moving.

Although her EPBU team and the challenges they face are new, the welcoming culture that drew Rima to Cummins in the first place is still here. No matter where her day takes her, fellow team members are always willing to lend a hand or provide guidance. 

"Anyone will take five or ten minutes of their time to help you," Rima says.

In part, it's this cooperative culture that pushes Rima forward, along with the knowledge that she's a valuable team member helping to push the limits of electrification; on the other, the potential for her work to make a positive, widespread impact on the future of power outweighs the unknown.


Interested in Electrification at Cummins? Explore our careers.


Read more stories from team members in Cummins' Electrified Power Business Unit.

Read Odaro's Story

Lauren Cole

Lauren is the Global Employer Brand Digital Communications Specialist for Cummins Inc, where she focuses on social media, employer branding, and digital media. Lauren joined the company in early 2017 and has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Indiana University. She currently resides in Columbus, IN.

Odaro Omusi Experiences Electrical Engineering Without Boundaries

Odaro Omusi, Electric Vehicle System Integration Specialist

The fluorescent light bounces off his plastic protective eyewear as he stands proudly on the shop floor, hands pocketed in his standard-issue Cummins jacket. The sprawling equipment and line of hybrid buses ready for maintenance seem to be calling to him. 

Odaro Omusi, Electric Vehicle System Integration Specialist, smiles like he's gazing fondly into the past. To be sure, he remembers the details vividly.

Odaro Omusi
Odaro Omusi, Electric Vehicle System Integration Specialist

"It's a place where, at any point in time, the lights might go out," Odaro says. 

Growing up in his hometown of Lagos, Nigeria's largest city and commercial hub, the lack of electrical infrastructure was always present. This context, paired with Omusi's interest in computers and engineering, became a catalyst for his curiosity. 

He remembers thinking, "I don't know how to fix the problems, but how can I be a part of trying to solve them?"


Odaro finds opportunities in education and beyond.

Odaro has no shortage of educational experience, to say the least. With two bachelor's degrees - one in electrical engineering and another in economics - plus a master's degree in electrical engineering, he quickly found an internship at Cummins.

"I really like working at Cummins because of the culture especially. I always got the sense that people actually cared about me trying to develop and grow."

This internship experience, he mentions, seemed to be different than his vision of what internships would include. Odaro definitely wasn't the stereotypical intern who grabbed coffee for coworkers. Instead, he was a key member of a helpful, diverse team.

"There's a huge emphasis on diversity at Cummins, which was really cool, just to see them be welcoming to everyone."

But Odaro wasn't just welcomed. He was constantly encouraged. He attended a "speed mentoring" event (think: speed dating but for professional development). Hosted by the Women's Employee Resource Grop, one of many employee resource groups at Cummins, the event led Odaro to meet his mentor, who in turn introduced him to a number of other team members. 

It was this collective effort from multiple mentors vested in Odaro's career growth that ultimately led him to his current role in the electrification space at Cummins. 


The future of electrified power looks bright.

After nearly five years at Cummins, Odaro is on the front lines of innovative change in the transportation industry, implementing new electric bus technology on a daily basis. And that's exactly where he wants to be.

"We could be talking about a complete revolution of transportation in the next few decades. Being part of that evolution is really exciting."

Odaro sees plenty of changes brewing in his future with Cummins, which excited him even more. The potential for growth, for innovation, for new possibilities in electrified power - there's a certain mystery about what's on the horizon. 

"It's growing and you're not sure exactly where it's going to go. But just the fact that it's growing is really exciting."

For Odaro, the great unknown is a fun place to explore.


What's so great about Cummins?

Looking back, Odaro remembers reading up on different companies when deciding where he wanted to apply. He had seen so many brochures, so many sheets of paper that seemed to promise the same bland experiences.

"The recruitment brochures from different companies all kind of look the same," he says. "As someone who's lived the Cummins experience, I can say that the experience does match what was talked about before I got here."

Whether it's the welcome culture, the hands-on experiences, or the thrill of taking part in an energy revolution, Odaro has never looked back. 

"At this point, you don't know where the ceiling is, and the bounds aren't fully known."


Want to work in electrification at Cummins? Explore our careers.

Lauren Cole

Lauren is the Global Employer Brand Digital Communications Specialist for Cummins Inc, where she focuses on social media, employer branding, and digital media. Lauren joined the company in early 2017 and has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Indiana University. She currently resides in Columbus, IN.

Mentoring Month: John Judd

As we close National Mentoring Month, we want to thank each Cummins employee who took the time to share their mentoring experiences with everyone, and the employees that mentor every day throughout the company. Thank you for your dedication to our Values of Caring, Teamwork, Diversity and Inclusion, Excellence, and Integrity. 

John Judd, Plant Manager – Rocky Mount Engine Plant (RMEP), closes out the month sharing his mentoring experiences over his 30-year career with Cummins.

Q: Were you mentored at Cummins?

A: Yes. My career at Cummins started when I was very young, and I know I would not be in the leadership position I am today without the guidance and advice of numerous mentors. My most impactful mentors were Ken Anderson, Executive Director – Components Supply Chain and Kevin Aker, former Executive Director – Global Manufacturing Engineering (retired in 2017). Had it not been for these mentors, I would not have finished school or been prepared to perform the duties associated with my current role.

John Judd and Ralph Emerson.jpg

Q: Do you mentor at Cummins?

A:  Yes, I have formally and informally mentored throughout my career. I mentor and coach young adults in our community and mentor employees at RMEP. Currently, I am mentoring three employees at RMEP.

 

Q: Is mentoring important, and how long should a mentorship last?

A: Mentoring is important to get an honest perspective of yourself and to have a person to exchange ideas with, other than your boss. A mentor relationship is probably one year, then it becomes coaching opportunities after that.

Lauren Cole

Lauren is the Global Employer Brand Digital Communications Specialist for Cummins Inc, where she focuses on social media, employer branding, and digital media. Lauren joined the company in early 2017 and has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Indiana University. She currently resides in Columbus, IN.

Mentoring Month: Chen Hua

We continue to celebrate National Mentoring Month by acknowledging some of the dedicated Cummins employees exemplifying the Values of Caring, Excellence, and Teamwork by mentoring fellow Cummins employees.

Chen Hua, General Manager of Beijing Foton Cummins Engine Company (BFCEC), is sharing his Cummins mentoring experiences.

Chen Hua_Portrait Photo.jpg

Q: Were you mentored at Cummins?

A: Yes, I had three formal mentors over my career path at Cummins. Tim Winterburn, David Moorehouse, and Mark Smith. I’ve been lucky enough to have these mentors to turn to for support at various stage of career. Being Chinese, I was finding it challenging to have cross-culture communications with my global peers and build trustworthy long-term relationships. Mark Smith invested time in me and worked to help me improve my internal and external communications and leadership skills at the corporate level. My mentors helped me gain crucial leadership insights into their thinking process and how they handle conflicts and situations.

I have also participated in several group mentoring programs that allow mentees to learn from each other and from other mentors. They’ve all been extremely generous with their time, their knowledge and willingness to help me find my way.

One employee engages a coworker in a mentoring session.
 

Q: Do you mentor at Cummins?

A:  Yes. Mentoring has played a huge role in my career growth, so I have taken my responsibility to mentor quite seriously. Each year I mentor five to eight high potential employees, who are at different stages of their career and am currently mentoring six employees.

As one of the sponsors of the gender diversity group, I have mentored several female employees. And am a member of the global leadership mentoring program, where I coach a number of high potential employees.

 

Q: Is mentoring important?

A: I believe mentoring is extremely important for everyone, whether it be formal or informal, mentor-mentee or a peer-to-peer. In my experience, mentoring is a fantastic way to gain insight into where your career may lead. Strong relationships with my mentors have helped me challenge myself, improve and grow. I want to lead others the way my mentors led me. I want to teach and help people grow, just as my mentors taught and helped me.

 

Lauren Cole

Lauren is the Global Employer Brand Digital Communications Specialist for Cummins Inc, where she focuses on social media, employer branding, and digital media. Lauren joined the company in early 2017 and has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Indiana University. She currently resides in Columbus, IN.

Mentoring Month: Anne McLaren

January is National Mentoring Month, dedicated to raising the awareness of the need for mentors and recognizing the work mentors have done in the lives of others. 

Many people think mentoring is an adult helping to guide the future of our youth. While that is a common practice of mentoring, professional mentors are equally important. In fact, Cummins was built on mentoring, as William Irwin mentored his great-nephew, J. Irwin Miller, who would later usher Cummins into where it is today.

In honor of National Mentoring Month, Anne E. McLaren, Technical Advisor – Reliability Engineer, is sharing her Cummins mentoring experiences.

Anne McLaren
Anne McLaren

Q: Who mentored you at Cummins?

A: I have had two formal mentors at Cummins over the years. Mike Sharp was a technical mentor to me for the first five years of my career, and Cheryl Klepser has mentored me for most of the 15.5 years I’ve been with Cummins. I have also participated in a number of group-mentoring programs that allow mentees to learn from each other and from other mentors.

 

Q: Have you mentored anyone at Cummins?

A:  I have informally mentored hundreds of people at Cummins and formally mentored dozens. As the global corporate discipline leader for reliability engineering, I am the functional manager for all reliability engineers around the globe. I have formally and informally mentored some of them.  Each summer, I formally mentor interns through several employee resource groups, university recruiting, or functional programs. I am also a leader in the diversity and inclusion space and mentor participants through those groups. I have also served as a mentor in a number of the speed mentoring events, where you have short sessions of mentoring multiple people in a one-time event. Lastly, I help to organize programs for peer mentoring and group mentoring.

 

Q: Is mentoring important?

A: I believe mentoring is extremely important for everyone, whether it be formal or informal, mentor-mentee or a peer-to-peer. The guidance sought can be specific to a functional job assignment, or it can be less tactical and more strategic in terms of how to be more effective in a current role or to seek career guidance for a future role. A mentoring relationship should be built on trust, which will take time to establish. Both the mentor and the mentee should feel comfortable sharing and have the mentee’s best interests at heart.

Interested in learning more about life at Cummins or how you can make an impact? Check out careers.cummins.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram

 

Lauren Cole

Lauren is the Global Employer Brand Digital Communications Specialist for Cummins Inc, where she focuses on social media, employer branding, and digital media. Lauren joined the company in early 2017 and has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from Indiana University. She currently resides in Columbus, IN.

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