Cummins electrolyzers power first-of-its kind hydrogen refuelling station

The Port of Antwerp, Belgium, will be home to the world’s first hydrogen refueling station capable of supplying green hydrogen directly to ships, cars, trucks and industrial customers. The station, built by CMB.TECH, will utilize the Cummins HyLYZER®-250, a 1.2 MW PEM electrolyzer, to produce hydrogen on site. CMB.TECH is the cleantech division of CMB. The company is an active developer and integrator of hydrogen solutions with a focus on engineering, hydrogen production, industrial and marine applications.
 
Located at a port house between the city and the port, the fueling station is perfectly positioned to provide industrial applications and ships in the port with hydrogen and be easily accessible to the general public. Cummins Inc. has already delivered electrolyzers for more than 60 hydrogen fueling stations across the globe, providing onsite hydrogen generation through electrolysis. A single 1 MW electrolyzer system can generate over 400 kg of hydrogen daily at fuel-cell-grade purity, enough to fuel 16 freight trucks up to 600 miles (over 950 km) each. These systems have already been scaled successfully to over 20 MW.

When electrolyzers are powered by renewable energy sources such as wind, solar or hydroelectric, the hydrogen is totally green, with zero well-to-wheel carbon emissions.

For years, Cummins has been focused on solutions that use materials and technologies that have less impact on the planet to deliver value and prosperity for our customers and communities. In 2019, the company published PLANET 2050, an ambitious plan which includes science-based targets aligned with the Paris climate accords and a target to be carbon neutral by 2050. 

Accessible hydrogen refueling stations are a vital part of the emissions reduction journey, as they make hydrogen-powered transport a realistic option. Cummins sees governments around the world supporting the adoption of hydrogen technologies in different ways and believe that all policies should encourage infrastructure support.

Infrastructure is needed to ensure Cummins' systems can support the adoption of hydrogen and fuel cell technology economy wide. Government investment in infrastructure sends a strong signal to the industry that this transition is happening and creates more certainty for investments.

In Antwerp, refueling is fast and simple (dispensing at 700 bar for cars and 350 bar for buses and trucks). In addition to the fueling station, the site will also contain two trailer docks that can be used to transport excess green hydrogen for industrial and refueling activities elsewhere. Already well underway, the refueling station will be open to customers in 2021.
 

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Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Setting sail on hydrogen with Hydro Motion

Setting sail on hydrogen with Hydro Motion

A team of 20 ambitious students of various disciplinary backgrounds came together to form the TU Delft Solar Team 2021 and enter uncharted waters with Hydro Motion, a boat that not only sails, but flies on hydrogen. After 15 years of building boats successfully powered by sunlight, the 2021 team decided it was time to swap solar panels for a fuel cell to take the next step towards a more sustainable maritime industry.

The Netherlands-based team has spent the last nine months taking its new flying boat from concept to reality. With a focus on building a well-functioning hydrogen boat, they decided to refit the 2019 flying solar boat and use its three award-winning hulls and seaworthy trimaran. The solar panels were removed, and a hydrogen system was installed.

A TU Delft Solar Team member working to  install the Cummins HyPM-HD30 fuel cell
A TU Delft Solar Team member working to install the Cummins HyPM-HD30 fuel cell

The boat is powered by the Cummins HyPM-HD30 fuel cell and will convert 99.9% pure hydrogen into electricity to power the boat’s driveline, electronics and other devices. The hydrogen is stored in a gaseous state in the hydrogen system tank, which has a 350-liter capacity and can store more than 8 kg of hydrogen gas, exceeding 265 kWH energy.

The fuel cell generates electricity through a chemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen. To power the boat, the hydrogen gas from the storage tank will pass through the fuel cell stack and mix with atmospheric oxygen. In each cell of the fuel cell stack, the hydrogen splits off two electrons which cannot pass the proton exchange membrane that separates the hydrogen from the atmospheric oxygen. The hydrogen protons pass through the membrane to join with oxygen to form water vapor, and the two electrons travel around the membrane through a wire as electricity. That electricity will be used to power the boat’s motor. 

Hydrogen is an advantageous alternative power source for the boat because it produces no carbon dioxide, has an energy density greater than lithium ion batteries and is lighter weight than batteries. However, the boat’s large size makes it more challenging to maneuver on Mediterranean waters and while it can sail smoothly on hydrogen, it will need an extra boost to reach the right take-off speed to fly.

That extra boost is a small battery pack optimized for power density. Combined, the battery pack and the HyPM-HD30 power a 70-hp, three phase electric brushless motor, similar to a Toyota Yaris car. The combination of power sources ensures there is enough power to take off. Once the hulls of the boat are out of the water and the boat is only flying on its hydrofoils, the 30-kW fuel cell is again sufficient to power the boat. The take-off takes place at 13.6 mph. At this point, the hulls are lifted out of the water and fly 40 cm above the surface with a speed of more than 20 mph.

The team revealed its boat to the public via livestream on May 10 at the Maritime Museum Rotterdam. Two weeks later, the team put the boat in open water at the Port of Rotterdam for the first time to conduct its first wet-test. Test 1 results showed the boat is watertight, sails stably on batteries and has a sailing speed of 20 km/h with 2000 rpm on the propeller. The students will continue testing and improving the boat over the next few weeks to increase speed, sail using the hydrogen system, and check for safety, efficiency and endurance. 

Once testing is complete, three team members will captain the boat in the Monaco Solar & Energy Boat Challenge. This international challenge invites students and professionals from across the world to compete in three classes: Energy, Solar and Open Sea Class. The TU Delft Solar Team will sail the open ocean and compete in the Open Sea Class.

Two TU Delft Solar Team members with Dutch politician, Jan Terlouw, at the christening of Hydro Motion
Two TU Delft Solar Team members with Dutch politician, Jan Terlouw, at the christening of Hydro Motion

Powered by hydrogen, using a Cummins fuel cell and the minds of 20 dedicated students, the first flying hydrogen boat is propelling the world another league further towards a zero-carbon future and a more sustainable maritime industry. As the TU Delft Solar Boat Team continues to work on Hydro Motion to get it competition ready, we look forward to the day they fly over the finish line on green energy.

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Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Cummins celebrates commitment to the environment during European Green Week

Cummins celebrates commitment to the environment during European Green Week

Cummins Inc. has been at the forefront of environmental sustainability for decades. As one of the first in the industry to publish a sustainability report and the first to embrace more stringent emissions standards in the U.S., as well as help countries across the globe achieve similar, more stringent standards, Cummins’ commitment to the environment is unwavering.

For several years, Cummins has focused on solutions that use materials and technologies that have less impact on the planet to deliver value and prosperity for our customers and communities. In 2019 Cummins published PLANET 2050, an ambitious plan which includes science-based targets aligned with the Paris Agreement and a target to be carbon neutral by 2050.

As we celebrate European Green week 2021 (May 31– June 4), we look back at some of the successes and achievements in Europe from a policy and product perspective and give an insight into what’s to come.

European Green Week

European Green Week 2021 is dedicated to the Zero Pollution Ambition. The EU Action Plan towards a Zero Pollution Ambition is a key action of the European Green Deal and will help create a cleaner environment across the EU by better monitoring, reporting, preventing and remedying pollution from air, water, soil and consumer products. The EU Next Generation Funds, conceived as the instrument to recover for the COVID 19 crisis, will make € 672.5 billion in loans and grants available to support reforms and investments undertaken by Member States, mainly through the Recovery and Resilience Facility. The aim is to help build a more sustainable economy and create job opportunities, dedicating at least 37% of the total amount of the recovery plan to green investments and reforms. 

Leading the way in Europe

In July 2020, the European Commission announced its hydrogen strategy to explore the potential of clean hydrogen in decarbonizing the EU economy in a cost-effective way, in line with the 2050 climate neutrality goal set out in the European Green Deal. Since then, we have seen countries across Europe announce their own hydrogen strategies and plans for emissions reduction, including the UK. The EU has also reached an agreement on the EU Climate Law that aims to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels, in order to reach carbon neutrality by 2050.

Cummins has also made clear its commitment to hydrogen in the region, breaking ground at a new fuel cell systems production facility in Germany, and more recently announcing its plans for one of the world’s largest electrolyzer plants for the production of green hydrogen to be located in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. The investment in Spain comes on the heels of Iberdrola and Cummins’ decision to partner together on large-scale hydrogen production projects in Spain and Portugal. 

Cummins continues to be at the forefront of electrolyzer technology, offering both PEM and alkaline solutions. HyBalance, Denmark, is one of Europe’s most advanced hydrogen production facilities. Since 2018, the 1.2-megawatt PEM electrolyzer has produced 120 tons of hydrogen, enabling 24/7 delivery of 60 tons of hydrogen to an industrial customer and demonstrating its ability to balance the electricity grid. The remaining 60 tons have been delivered to other customers, including hydrogen stations for fuel cell taxis in Denmark’s capital city, Copenhagen. In Falkenhagen, Germany, six Cummins HySTAT 60 alkaline electrolyzers were installed and are used to convert wind energy into hydrogen. At the time of commissioning, the facility, located in the state of Brandenburg, was the world’s first megawatt-scale demonstration project for storing wind energy in the natural gas grid. In the first year of operation, more than two million kilowatt hours of hydrogen was fed into the gas grid.  

Cummins fuel cells are also continuing to lead the way in emissions-free rail transport across Europe. Powered by Cummins fuel cells, Alstom trains are now running in Germany, Italy and Austria, with the list of countries continuing to grow. The trains use on-board fuel cells to convert hydrogen and oxygen into electricity, emitting only steam and water and reducing operating emissions to zero. 

The future is bright

With two new facilities on the way and dedicated employees across three locations in Europe, the future of hydrogen is bright. Cummins is excited to contribute to the path to zero in Europe through all its technologies. In order to achieve this, it is essential to find the right regulatory balance between phase-out deadlines of current technologies and infrastructure development to help industries adapt and consolidate new markets and technologies, such as green hydrogen and fuel cells. Together with policies that are technology neutral, this will enable investment in the future and achievement of the EU’s climate goals. Ahead of the fit for 55 Package, governments at all levels must partner with industry to develop the right infrastructure investments, research and innovation ambitions. Coupled with smart policy frameworks, this will pave the way to accelerate the green transition, generate jobs and strengthen industrial activity.  

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Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Large-scale electrolysis' role in global decarbonization

Cummins - Electrolysis at scale - hero

The world is racing to drastically lower greenhouse gas emissions and limit the earth's warming to 1.5 degrees from pre-industrial levels. To reach this goal, 189 parties, representing the producers of 83 percent of global emissions, have ratified the Paris Climate Agreement. In addition, 66 countries have now stated their intentions to be carbon neutral by 2050, with several passing these targets into law.  

How do countries reach these ambitious goals? Renewable hydrogen – produced through electrolysis from renewable sources – is a significant part of the answer. Developing and deploying green hydrogen solutions is one important strategy.  

What is large-scale green electrolysis? 

Electrolysis is a highly efficient electrochemical reaction that uses electricity to break down water (H20) into its constituent elements, hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2). Electrolysis is considered “green” if the electricity used comes from renewable sources, such as solar, hydro or wind energy. In these instances, hydrogen production emits no greenhouse gasses, making it green hydrogen.  

Cummins - Large scale electrolysis - infographic
Large-scale electrolyzer installations can be powered directly by renewable electricity, as depicted in the infographic above. This is considered "green" electrolysis. 

Large-scale electrolyzer installations can be powered directly by renewable electricity, helping to enable the efficient use of clean energy, despite the variability that characterizes some renewable energy sources. For example, when excess solar energy is produced (e.g. the sun is shining, but the demand for electricity is less than is produced), solar energy can power an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen, allowing energy to be storable for long periods of time.  

Currently, the Cummins electrolyzer system installed at the Air Liquide hydrogen production facility in Bécancour, Quebec, can produce nearly 3,000 tons of hydrogen annually using clean hydropower. It is the largest PEM electrolyzer in operation at 20 MW; however, the industry is rapidly rising to projects of 100 MW, 200 MW and beyond.  

Why is large-scale electrolysis important? 

Scaling up electrolysis projects and capabilities is important for several reasons.  

Decreasing the Cost of Hydrogen 

Today, hydrogen is expensive. The cost of hydrogen needs to come down to enable broad adoption. Thanks to economies of scale, as production cost decreases, so does the cost for customers, paving the way for adoption across more markets and regions. As the use of hydrogen becomes more widespread, infrastructure will follow suit.  

Expanding Decarbonization 

Cheaper hydrogen will allow other sectors, like transport, to decarbonize. Cheaper hydrogen will facilitate wider adoption of hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicles.  

Achieving Global Climate Goals  

Many countries and cities have ambitious climate targets. Using green hydrogen for applications, like chemicals production or in the gas grid for heating homes, reduces impact on the environment.  

One country taking advantage of large-scale electrolysis to support its decarbonization strategy is Spain. Cummins is locating one of the world’s largest electrolyzers in the Castilla La-Mancha area and partnering with Spanish utility provider Iberdrola to help the country reach its goal of producing 4 GW of installed hydrogen production capacity by 2030.  

Learn more about Cummins project and partnership pioneering hydrogen production in Spain.

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Why Cummins selected Spain to expand its footprint for hydrogen generation

Cummins - Hydrogen Electrolyzer - Spain - web
Cummins is locating one of the world’s largest electrolyzer plants for the production of green hydrogen in Spain.

Cummins is locating one of the world’s largest electrolyzer plants for the production of green hydrogen in Spain. The 22,000-square meter facility will produce the world’s largest electrolyzer systems, with an initial production capacity of 500 MW/year and is scalable to more than 1 GW/year.

A site selection search is underway within Castilla-La Mancha, Spain, with the facility expected to open in 2023.

So, why Spain?

Government Support 

Spain’s government is committed to accelerating clean hydrogen production through its hydrogen roadmap. Cummins’ new electrolyzer plant will help the country make strides towards its goal of 4 GW of electrolyzer capacity by 2030. 

Large Hydrogen Market 

With this focus on shifting to hydrogen, Spain offers a large domestic market for hydrogen, both for current industrial and agriculture customers, as well as future mobility and other applications. The country’s goals include ramping up hydrogen-powered bus systems, light and heavy vehicles and commercial rail lines. 

Cummins Spain - Hydrogen Electrolyzer - Hydrogen Footprint
Take a glance at the new Cummins electrolyzer production plan in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain...by the numbers! 

Positive Economics 

Solar costs in Spain have been dropping and are now among the lowest in Europe. This provides a competitive advantage for green hydrogen, both domestically and for potential export to the rest of Europe and beyond. 

Workforce Poised for Innovation 

With one of the largest economies in the European Union, Spain’s robust technical and manufacturing workforce is a great home for expanded hydrogen production and innovation.

Spain offers an ideal environment to expand Cummins’ hydrogen production capacity, while supporting their renewable energy goals through our leadership in alternative power technologies. Together, we can further decarbonization and accelerate the hydrogen economy.

Learn more about our plans to build one of the world’s largest electrolyzer facilities in Spain.

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

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