Four markets you may not know Cummins can power with hydrogen fuel cells

Fuel Cell Roundup - Cummins

Cummins began developing its fuel cell and related technologies more than 20 years ago and through its Hydrogenics Business, which is a part of Cummins, there is more than 70 years of participation within the hydrogen market. The company is investing in fuel cell technologies that will utilize hydrogen and convert it to electricity; while developing fully integrated fuel cell powertrains, fuel cell range-extender powertrains and stationary fuel cell systems.  

Cummins will participate in the hydrogen ecosystem as both the provider of fuel and powertrains solutions, which means the company will be able to offer a full, differentiated hydrogen solution from start to finish, seamlessly integrated for customers.  

Fuel cells can provide zero tailpipe emissions, instantaneous torque, excellent range and rapid refueling. Additionally, Cummins sees increased subsidies and incentives focused on hydrogen-based technologies and infrastructure. 

Several fuel cell solutions have been introduced in key markets to help the company continue leading the industry in fuel cell technologies, including the four below: 

Fuel Cell Trains 

Coradia iLintAlthough powering a passenger train with hydrogen sounds like science-fiction, it’s a reality in Europe. Hydrogen fuel cells are recognized as one of the innovative solutions necessary for a carbon-neutral future, generating enough energy to power passenger trains. The French railway manufacturer Alstom is among the first railway manufacturers in the world to develop a passenger train based on such a technology. Powered by Cummins-supplied fuel cells, the first trains are in regular service, running in the northern German town of Bremervorde. Following this successful test operation in Germany, now Alstom’s Coradia iLint train, powered by Cummins’ fuel cells, will run in Austria for the first time in regular passenger rail service for ÖBB, the Austrian Federal Railways. 

Fuel Cell Delivery Trucks 

Fuel Cell Delivery TruckCurrently, there are four Scania trucks powered by Cummins’ hydrogen fuel cell modules in Trondheim, Norway. The trucks are part of a pilot with ASKO, Norway’s largest grocery wholesaler. ASKO looked to fuel cell technology as they are focusing on efficiency, low emissions and sustainable development in its extensive distribution network. This pilot will serve as the basis for further learning and development for the fleet and operations. Additionally, it is putting ASKO on a path to reducing energy consumption by 20%, becoming a self-sufficient provider of clean energy, using 100% renewable fuel. 

Fuel Cell Refuse Trucks 

Fuel Cell Refuse TruckThough waste may not always make prime time news, the technologies helping with waste management have made great strides, and Cummins is pushing those strides even further by providing fuel cells for some of the first licensed and commercially operational fuel cell refuse trucks in Europe. To date, Cummins has provided more than 20 fuel cell power modules, often referred to as fuel cell “engines,” to a range of truck builders across Europe. Cummins supplied fuel cells for FAUN, a leader in waste collection vehicles and sweepers in Europe, for their electric refuse truck program. Once FAUN integrated the fuel cells into their vehicles, each truck has a 100% electric drive and is 100% emissions free, with a range up to 560 km (approximately 350 miles); enough to run the collection route multiple times carrying 10 tons of waste. 

Fuel Cell Class 8 Demonstrator Truck 

Fuel Cell Class 8 Demonstrator TruckThe culmination of more than 20 years of research and development around fuel cell technologies was unveiled during the 2019 North American Commercial Vehicle (NACV) show, when Cummins displayed a heavy-duty truck with fuel cell and battery electric power. The zero-emissions class 8, 6x4 cab tractor is a technology demonstrator suitable for vocational applications, including regional haul, urban delivery operations, port drayage and terminal container handling. The truck was designed for 90 kW fuel cells and is scalable in 30 kW or 45 kW increments, up to 180 kW. The fuel cell truck also has a 100 kW lithium-ion battery capacity; with a range of 150 - 250 miles between filling up, but that range can be extended with additional hydrogen tanks, increasing the tank storage pressure, or installing additional fuel cells to optimize management of the vehicle load factor. 

Today, fuel cell vehicles are not cost competitive without incentives, but a glidepath to reach cost parity with the internal combustion engine is visible in the next decade for some markets and applications; and Cummins is positioned to continue delivering the right technology solution, at the right time at the highest level of value to its customers, continuing to be an industry trailblazer. 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Cummins: Making a splash with these hydrogen headlines

Cummins Hydrogen Day news roundup
Fresh on the heels of our virtual Hydrogen Day event, we've compiled a roundup of some of the latest headlines making waves in the hydrogen fuel cell space

As a company focused on serving its customers and all its stakeholders, Cummins rarely seeks the spotlight.

But the recent focus on hydrogen  - and its place in helping decrease the negative impacts of climate change and decarbonizing the power sectors - has caught the attention of many journalists and thought leaders from around the world. And rightfully so. 

Is hydrogen the future? Only time will tell, but as we highlighted during our recent Hydrogen Day virtual event, we certainly think the future looks bright for hydrogen and its place in helping build a green economy

Here’s a roundup of some of the latest headlines making waves in the hydrogen fuel cell space.  

Diesel engine giant Cummins plans Hydrogen future with trains coming before trucks, Forbes 

Cummins is starting to ditch diesel for hydrogen, Fox Business

Why Jim Cramer is watching Cummins stock, TheStreet.com 

Cummins outlines the future of Hydrogen technologies, Transport Topics 

Cummins believes in the future of Hydrogen. Nikola stock is the one that jumped, Barron’s 

Cummins: New technologies on the horizon, H2View 

Cummins lays out vision for a hydrogen future, Truck News 

Cummins sees $400M in revenue from making hydrogen in 2025, Freightwaves 

Cummins drives ahead with hydrogen, International Construction 

Cummins outlines hydrogen plans, Just Auto

Cummins looks to the future, details hydrogen power development plans, Fleet Equipment Magazine

Cummins hydrogen power systems and electrolyzers aiming at trains first, Hydrogen Fuel News

Cummins details hydrogen power development plans, Engine Builder

Cummins reveals road map to Carbon-free Hydrogen economy, HDT Truckinginfo

katie zarich author bio photo

Katie Zarich

Katie Zarich is Manager of External Communications for Cummins Inc. She joined the Company in 2015 after more than a decade working in government and the nonprofit sector. [email protected]

Cummins celebrates first European Hydrogen Week with a look-back at hydrogen and fuel cell successes in Europe

Cummins celebrates first European Hydrogen Week with a look-back at hydrogen and fuel cell successes in Europe

Hydrogen will contribute significantly to the transition to clean technology in Europe, and across the world. In July, the European Commission announced its hydrogen strategy to explore the potential of clean hydrogen to help the process of decarbonising the EU economy in a cost-effective way, in line with the 2050 climate-neutrality goal, set out in the European Green Deal. To match the interest and importance of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the energy transition, this week the first European Hydrogen Week takes place. 

At Cummins, we are proud of our ability to innovate and scale hydrogen fuel cell technologies across a range of commercial markets. September marked the one-year anniversary of the acquisition of Hydrogenics, which expanded Cummins alternative power solutions to include fuel cell technologies and hydrogen production capabilities. In addition, just last week Cummins held its Hydrogen Day event, where it revealed the potential of a decarbonised future fuelled by hydrogen. As we look to the future, we see many new possibilities and opportunities to better serve our customers and our planet. 

To celebrate the first European Hydrogen Week, join us as we look-back at Cummins’ successes in fuel cell and hydrogen technologies in Europe. 

 

Cummins to open new fuel cell systems production facility in Germany, strengthening its commitment to hydrogen in EuropeNorway’s Largest Grocery Wholesaler Gives Hydrogen a SpinCummins Delivers Fuel Cells for Refuse Trucks in EuropeHenok's focus on quality makes him the perfect fit

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Three Cummins hydrogen production facilities that are helping build a green economy

Hydrogen elctrolyzer

To decrease the negative impacts of climate change and decarbonize the power sector, renewable technologies like wind and solar have emerged as key ingredients to providing a solution. But integrating these intermittent energy sources into the power grid can be challenging. This is where electrolyzers come. Hydrogen makes other forms of renewable energy more viable by providing efficient and portable storage of electricity. Electrolyzers enable the production of hydrogen, which can be used by industrial clients or stored and used to power applications, including trains, buses, trucks and more, and Cummins has hundreds operational in the field.  

Take wind turbines as an example. Electrolyzers can economically convert wind energy to hydrogen and oxygen in a process called water electrolysis. Water electrolysis produces no harmful emissions — only oxygen and hydrogen. Hydrogen is produced when electricity prices are low which is typically the case when wind energy is abundant. Then, the hydrogen can be stored or transported  to customers. Hydrogen’s potential for storing and transporting energy makes it a key enabler of a global transition to renewable energy. 

Cummins made a bold entry into the hydrogen economy in September 2019 with the acquisition of Hydrogenics, a global hydrogen fuel cells and electrolyzer technology manufacturer, and Cummins continues to make quick progress in innovating new products and applications in the hydrogen space, including three electrolyzers that are making an impact:  

HyBalance – Denmark: Supplying clean hydrogen to 1,000 fuel cell vehicles  

HyLYZER PEM ElectrolyzerCummins, along with its partners, established this 1.2-megawatt proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer site more than two years ago in Denmark. The site supplies clean hydrogen to customers of Air Liquide, a world leader in gases, technologies and services for Industry and Health, with Air Liquide operating the site. The PEM electrolyzer in Denmark is capable of supplying a fleet of more than 100 fuel cell electric vehicles per day and could contribute up to 0.5 percent of the transport sector greenhouse gas reduction targets in Denmark. 

Douglas County – U.S.A.: Enabling utilities to store excess energy 

Expected to be operational in 2021, this 5-megawatt PEM electrolyzer located in Douglas County in Washington state (U.S.A) will be the largest, as well as first of its kind in use by a public utility, in the United States. The new renewable hydrogen facility allows the Douglas County Public Utility District (PUD) to manufacture commercial hydrogen using electrolysis to harvest hydrogen from water from Wells Dam on the Columbia River. Cummins’ PEM electrolyzers, like Douglas County PUD’s electrolyzer, enables utilities to store the excess energy that they would typically sell off to the market at a financial loss, or not harness at all, and instead store that energy to sell into a new green hydrogen market. Additionally, it creates a way for utilities to engage in new market opportunities outside of their typical service area, removing growth barriers often faced in the industry. This project is made possible by legislation passed in Washington state in 2019, which authorized public utility districts to make and sell hydrogen. 

Becancour – Canada: Building the largest PEM electrolysis plant in the world 

Cummins is in the final stages of commissioning the largest PEM electrolysis plant in the world in Becancour, Canada for Air Liquide. The 20-megawatt facility will have an annual hydrogen output of approximately 3,000 tons. The electrolyzer will use renewable hydroelectricity to generate decarbonized, and green, hydrogen. The facility is planned to be operational in the coming months.   

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Electrolyzers 101: What they are, how they work and where they fit in a green economy

Cummins electrolyzers - Hero image

As Cummins looks to the future, we see a shift in the energy market. With that change comes new possibilities and opportunities beyond our traditional product set. To better serve our customers and our planet, Cummins is innovating new, sustainable forms of power and bringing a wide range of new possibilities to the New Power product portfolio, providing a way to produce clean hydrogen to power hydrogen fuel cells, supply industrial processes or produce green chemicals like fertilizers, renewable natural gas and methanol. 

Cummins offers a variety of hydrogen-based technologies, including electrolyzer systems, and recently announced it will provide its 5-megawatt PEM electrolyzer to convert surplus hydro power to clean hydrogen for the Douglas County Public Utility District in Washington state (USA). But what exactly is an electrolyzer, how does it work and where does it fit in our green economy? 

What is an electrolyzer and how does it work?

Electrolysis - ElectrolyzerAn electrolyzer is a system that uses electricity to break water into hydrogen and oxygen in a process called electrolysis. Through electrolysis, the electrolyzer system creates hydrogen gas. The oxygen that’s left over is released into the atmosphere or can be captured or stored to supply other industrial processes or even medical gases in some cases.

The hydrogen gas can either be stored as a compressed gas or liquefied, and since hydrogen is an energy carrier it can be used to power any hydrogen fuel cell electric application — whether it’s trains, buses, trucks, or data centers. 

In its most basic form, an electrolyzer contains a cathode (negative charge), an anode (positive charge) and a membrane. The entire system also contains pumps, vents, storage tanks, a power supply, separator and other components. Water electrolysis is an electrochemical reaction which takes place within the cell stacks. Electricity is applied to the anode and cathode across the proton exchange membrane (PEM) and causes the water (H20) to split into its component molecules, hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2).

Are there different kinds of electrolyzers? 

Yes, they range in size and function. These electrolyzers can be scaled to meet a variety of input and output ranges, ranging in size from small industrial plants installed in shipping containers to large-scale centralized production facilities that can deliver the hydrogen by trucks or be connected to pipelines.

There are three main types of electrolyzers: proton echange membrane (PEM), alkaline and solid oxide. These different electrolyzers function in slightly different ways depending on the electrolyte material involved. Both alkaline and PEM electrolyzers can deliver on-site and on-demand hydrogen, pressurized hydrogen without a compressor and 99.999% pure, dry and carbon-free hydrogen.

The difference between the three main kinds of electrolyzers include:

Alkaline ElectrolyzerAlkaline Electrolyzers

  • Uses a liquid electrolyte solution such as potassium hydroxide (KOH) or sodium hydroxide (NAOH), and water. 
  • The hydrogen is produced in a “cell” which consists of an anode, cathode and membrane. The cells are typically assembled in series in a “cell stack” that produces more hydrogen and oxygen as the amount of cell increases. 
  • When current is applied on the cell stack, the hydroxide ions (OH-) move through the electrolyte from the cathode to the anode of each cell, with hydrogen gas bubbles generated on the cathode side of the electrolyzer and oxygen gas at the anode, as represented here.

 

Proton Exchange MembraneProton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Electrolyzers

  • PEM electrolyzers use a Proton Exchange Membrane which use a solid polymer electrolyte.
  • When current is applied on the cell stack, the water splits in hydrogen and oxygen and the hydrogen protons pass through the membrane to form H2 gas on the cathode side.

 

 

 

 

Solid Oxide ElectrolyzerSolid Oxide Electrolyzers (SOEC) 

  • Uses solid ceramic material as the electrolyte
  • Electrons from the external circuit combine with water at the cathode to form hydrogen gas and negatively charge ions. Oxygen then passes through the slid ceramic membrane and reacts at the anode to form oxygen gas and generate electrons for the external circuit
  • SOECs operate at a much higher temperature (above 500C) than alkaline and PEM electrolyzers (up to 80C) and have the potential to become much more efficient than PEM and alkaline.

 

How are electrolyzers commercialized based hydrogen production?

There are four main ways that electrolyzers can be commercialized:

  1. Power to mobility: Hydrogen can be used as fuel at refueling stations for fuel-cell electric vehicles such as buses, trains, and car.
  2. Power to Fuel: Be used in refineries to remove sulfur from fossil fuels. 
  3. Power to Industry: Be used directly as an industrial gas in the steel industry, flat glass plants, semi-conductor industry, etc.  It can also be injected directly into the natural gas grids for lower carbon heating and other natural gas applications.
  4. Power to Gas: Be used in the production of green chemicals such as methanol, fertilizers (ammonia) and any other liquid fuel, even jet fuel!  

Electrolyzer - Power to Industry

What’s so unique about hydrogen fuel cells?

The hydrogen produced from an electrolyzer is perfect for use with hydrogen fuel cells. Working much like a battery, fuel cells do not run down or need charging and produce electricity and heat as long as fuel is supplied. You can learn more about batteries and fuel cells here. The fuel cells use the hydrogen to generate electricity with zero emissions at the point of use. That means no fossil fuels or harmful emissions come from the tailpipe.

Even better, when the electrolyzer system is powered by a renewable energy source, such as a hydropower from the Columbia River Dams, the hydrogen produced is considered renewable and CO2-free from well to wheel. Learn more about well to wheel emissions in all-electric and fuel cell applications.

Why is hydrogen such a good option for clean energy?

Hydrogen presents an opportunity for mass market change in the energy industry. Energy systems across the globe are undergoing a fundamental transformation to focus on lower emissions and less negative impact on the environment.

To decrease the negative impacts of climate change and decarbonize the power sector, renewable technologies like wind and solar have emerged as key ingredients to providing a solution. But integrating these intermittent energy sources into the power grid can be challenging.

Hydrogen can act as an energy storage medium to address these grid challenges, allowing renewable power to be more easily used outside the electric power grid. Hydrogen is a stable way to store and transport renewable electricity efficiently over long periods of time. That way, renewable electricity generated by wind and solar that isn’t being used right away can be used another time or in another place. Hydrogen’s potential for storing and transporting energy makes it a key enabler of a global transition to renewable energy.

What is Cummins doing with electrolyzers?

Cummins made a bold entry into the hydrogen economy in September 2019 with the acquisition of Hydrogenics, a global hydrogen fuel cells and electrolyzer technology manufacturer. Cummins continues to make quick progress in innovating new products and applications in the hydrogen space, and currently, there are two different types of electrolyzers offered by Cummins:

  1. The HyLYZER® Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolyzer uses an ionically conductive solid polymer and is better suited for large-scale hydrogen production.
  2. The HySTAT® Alkaline Electrolyzer uses a liquid electrolyte and is well-suited for small- to medium-scale hydrogen production. 

Cummins is proud to be leading the charge in new hydrogen technology. With a century of experience in a multitude of power sources and drivetrains, we work with our customers to provide the right solution for the right customer at the right time. Whether it’s battery power, diesel, natural gas or fuel cells, your power is your choice.
 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Redirecting to
cummins.com

The information you are looking for is on
cummins.com

We are launching that site for you now.

Thank you.