How technology can help customers save over $30 million in fuel and avoid enough pollutants to fill a 15-mile long train

Think of a train loaded with 40 foot containers as long as the distance between your home and work (about 15 miles). This is what it would take to load all the pollutants avoided, thanks to the state-of-the-art technology used in Cummins Tier 4 high horsepower engines.

Cummins Tier 4 high horsepower engines have recently exceeded 10 million operating hours. These engines feature state-of-the-art technology significantly reducing the emission of environmentally harmful pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). You can see these engines featuring the latest emissions technology in operation in many applications ranging from railroad locomotives and marine vessels, to mining and oil and gas equipment.  

Let’s cover two reasons why Cummins’ Tier 4 technology is increasingly popular across many industries.

Reduced fuel usage means over $30 million of financial gains for customers and over 300,000 barrels of fuel savings for our planet

Owners of Cummins Tier 4 high horsepower engines are enjoying lower operating costs, since the fuel efficiency of these engines improved by up to 5% over Tier 2 engines, depending on the equipment duty cycle.

With 10 million running hours so far, we estimate our customers using Cummins Tier 4 high horsepower engines have experienced over $30M  of financial gains in the form of reduced fuel costs. This also translates into over 300,000 barrels of fuel savings for our planet.

Reduced environmental footprint is equal to removing the pollutants produced by over a half million cars

The technology Cummins uses in its Tier 4 engines significantly reduces PM and NOx emissions compared to earlier Tier 2 applications. PM contains microscopic solids or liquid droplets that are harmful to human health. A Tier 4 high horsepower engine with Cummins technology reduces PM emissions by 80% over a Tier 2 counterpart. NOx is most commonly known as the cause of smog, the brown sky often seen in large cities, and it also causes acid rains. A Cummins Tier 4 high horsepower engine emits 45% less NOx than a Tier 2 counterpart. 

Tier 4 technology delivers significant reductions in emission of harmful pollutants
Tier 4 technology delivers significant reductions in emission of harmful pollutants

These reductions in the environmental footprint add up quickly; 10 million operating hours across these Cummins engines translates into over 50,000 tons of PM and NOx avoided. Just the reduction in NOx emission is equivalent to taking more than 600,000 cars out of traffic for a year.

“Our mission at Cummins is to make people’s lives better by powering a more prosperous world, and this comes in many forms. In this case, our technology is helping our customers reduce their environmental footprint and decrease their operational costs while they enjoy excellent productivity,” said Gary Johansen, Executive Director of Power Systems Engineering at Cummins Inc.

Sign up below for Energy IQ to receive energy focused insights in markets ranging from data centers and healthcare facilities, to schools and manufacturing facilities, and everything beyond. 

Raise Your Energy IQ

Grow professionally with energy trends and insights delivered to your inbox. Read about energy technologies and trends on our Energy IQ Hub.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Repurposing methane produced from landfills for a more sustainable refuse market

Cummins Renewable Natural Gas

It’s no secret that trucking markets around the world are calling for cleaner fuel alternatives. In 2018, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the Clean Trucking Initiative to “ensure emissions reductions occur in the real world in all types of truck operation.”

With a specific reference to heavy-duty trucks and their impact on the environment, the refuse market has a unique opportunity to increase their use of renewable resources. How? By capturing and reusing landfill gases.

Landfills are an extreme threat to the ozone and are responsible for emitting raw methane gases. Raw methane gas is 40 times more potent than tail pipe exhaust and will remain trapped in the atmosphere for hundreds of years. But on the flip side, methane emissions from landfills also represent an undervalued opportunity to seize and repurpose a significant energy resource. 

Once methane is produced, it can go through three different levels of treatments in order to repurpose the gas in a productive manner. The primary and secondary treatments remove moisture and impurities, respectively. If these two steps are completed, the gas can be used to generate electricity in power generation plants. If the methane undergoes a third treatment to remove CO2, N2, O2, and VOCs (as needed), it can be reused for vehicle fuel as renewable natural gas (RNG). 

Renewable Natural Gas landfill process

This process creates the opportunity for a full life cycle of natural gas landfills. Waste companies, like Waste Management, are sending RNG-powered trucks to your neighborhood to collect waste and recycling. The material collected is then deposited into landfills and over time produces methane. That methane becomes a RNG through the cleansing process and then fuel to power the natural gas powered trucks that collect the waste. Cummins’ natural gas engine line already produces emissions 90% lower than EPA requirements; adding this fuel type further reduces Waste Management’s vehicles to net sub-zero emissions! 

On a larger scale, there are also opportunities for waste companies to funnel their RNG from landfills into the national natural gas pipeline network. The U.S. natural gas pipeline system totals over three million miles of pipeline across the country, providing natural gas to factories, hotels, city-owned facilities, convention sites, airports, commercial ship and motorized vehicle refueling sites, and finally into residential homes across the country. 

While both RNG and fossil natural gas share the same pipeline, the year-over-year expansion of injecting RNG into the pipeline will continue to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. To further encourage the growth and use of RNG in the United States, the EPA established the Renewable Identification Number program (or RIN). Fleets who contract the purchases and use RNG from authorized brokers receive full Greenhouse Gas reduction credits when pulling natural gas off the pipeline. 

It seems like a perfect solution. Is that because it is? Landfills, dairy farms, livestock farms and sewerage treatment plants all produce raw methane naturally. Capturing this abundant energy source and converting it to a very affordable energy source, then coupling it with Cummins’ renewable natural gas engine delivers net sub-zero emissions goods movement today. 

Next question, please. 

Learn more about Cummins natural gas solutions.  

Sources
Environmental Protection Agency: https://www.epa.gov/lmop/basic-information-about-landfill-gas 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Digging Deeper: Two aspects of improving productivity of mining operations

Digging Deeper: Two aspects of improving productivity of mining operations

Let’s define productivity as getting the job done faster, and increased productivity helps miners do more with less. In the mining business, productivity is sometimes less space being consumed by an engine, leaving room for more payload or less time to accelerate, thus maximizing the number of trips a day. 

Miners have several opportunities to improve their operational productivity; below focuses on two opportunities most relevant to increasing productivity of equipment ranging from haul trucks to excavators. 

No. 1: Extended maintenance intervals deliver higher productivity

Service intervals achieved at Dawson Mine through new filter technology
Service intervals achieved at Dawson Mine through new filter technology

The longer miners can run their equipment, the higher their productivity is. In most cases, mining equipment operates near continuously through days, weeks and months, and this creates the need for periodic maintenance events for filters, fluids and beyond. In this quest towards higher productivity, even these periodic planned maintenance events are open to questioning. 

Dawson coal mine in Queensland, Australia had firsthand experience of productivity gains, a 74% reduction of maintenance hours, with the use of new filter and telematics technologies from Cummins Inc. A combination of advanced analytics and telematics have helped the mine operator extend service intervals for fuel, lube, water and air filters and for lube oil. 

No.2: Engines capable to do more with less even in most extreme conditions

Miners are familiar with extreme conditions whether it is the elevation, temperature or accessibility, and understand how these conditions impact the performance of their equipment. For instance, reduced oxygen in high altitude locations result in losses in engine power; resulting in overall reduced mine productivity. Loss of engine power could lead into more trucks doing the same work or work being done slower, and neither are good solutions. More trucks would mean increased carbon footprint while doing the work slower means low productivity. 

Cummins engines accept the challenge of  extreme conditions  in a variety of applications at China’s largest copper mine site. Located at an altitude of 5,500 meters, higher than the base camp for Mt. Everest, the Julong Copper Mine features over 65 Cummins engines powering excavators, dump trucks, power generators, drillings and bulldozers. Haul trucks powered by Cummins QSK60 engines have continuous uptime in this severe environment, making it the top engine of choice at Julong.

“The mining industry will continue to find solutions to improve the productivity of its operations. Some of these, such as the extended maintenance intervals and engines capable to do more with less, will help miners both on sustainability and productivity fronts, a double gain for the industry,” said Steve Cummins, Director of Mining Business at Cummins.

 

To learn more about trends in the mining industry follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn. To learn more about mining power solutions Cummins offers, visit our webpage. To learn more about how Cummins is powering a world that’s “Always On,” visit our webpage.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Machine of the Month: Apache AS1250XP Sprayer

Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer with a B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine
The Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer with a B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine

Sprayers: They're big, they're versatile and they're one of the most valuable pieces of equipment for today's farmers.

One of the most important machines in the modern row-crop production cycle is the sprayer. From helping prepare the ground prior to planting, to applying fertilizer during key points in the growth cycle, a sprayer is a valuable piece of equipment for today’s farmers. 

The Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer by Equipment Technologies (ET), which is powered by either a 260 or 300 horsepower (HP) B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine, is one of the most efficient on the market. 

"With the new Performance Series engines, Apache sprayers receive a performance boost of up to 15 percent due to the increased power and torque available throughout the engine speed range," said Veera Rajendran, Vice President Engineering, ET. "They are also more productive on the farm, saving farmers eight percent in fuel with an overall combined fuel and Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) saving of three percent. Not only does this have significant environmental sustainability benefits, it also lowers operating costs – which is a big win for our customers," he added.

With a boom of up to 132 feet, a 1200 gallon product tank, a crop clearance of 50 inches and weighing 22,500 pounds (lb.), the Apache AS1250XP is the largest sprayer in the AS family. This sprayer can tackle an array of conditions in almost any field. 

In addition to the size and power needed to tackle any type of field condition, the AS family of sprayers are an Equipment Watch™ four-time award winner for highest retained value across all product categories.  
 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Digging Deeper: Five ways to boost the availability of your mining equipment

mining equipment

It could cost the mine operator over thousand dollars per hour for a mining dump truck or a mining excavator not to be working. With such high costs associated with downtime, there is no question how important it is to improve equipment availability within the mining industry. 

Let’s define equipment availability as the duration the equipment is ready when it matters. This is important for many applications, including you being able to do something personal like drive your car when you need it. However, what makes mining exceptional is the combination of downtime costs and the continuous need for the equipment to operate. A typical mine works 24/7 throughout the year, for years to decades. A mining haul truck could work for over 600 hours a month, which is the equivalent of two years of driving for an average U.S. driver

Given the importance of equipment availability for miners, let’s get into five impactful ways to boost its availability.

No. 1: Begin with the engines that offer the highest quality

Miners benefit from working with partners that offer extensive aftermarket capabilities, yet the best starting point for mine operators to maximize machine availability is to have reliable engines. This is a proactive approach and focuses on avoiding engine issues instead of trying to repair them.

Here is a real-life example on how engine reliability makes a difference. A customer from an Arizona (USA) mine site had concerns because their non-Cummins engines powering their haul trucks were not performing at the quality needed. The customer has decided to switch to Cummins QSK60 engines and consequently reported a 43% improvement in mean time to failure and a 69% improvement in mean time to repair.  

No. 2: Minimize downtime with access to plentiful spare engines

Mining operators can reduce their downtime and prevent financial losses by leveraging spare engines while their primary engines are going through planned or unplanned service. You do not need to buy and own these extra engines, instead you can work with partners capable of offering this service to you.

Cummins offers over 1,000 support engines ready to be shipped to our partners in the mining industry. This number is higher than the annual engine production of some of the smaller mining engine manufacturers.

No. 3: Reduce rebuild time by having access to capable and nearby rebuild centers

Rebuilding an engine instead of buying a new one helps mining operators reduce total life cycle cost of their equipment. Larger engine manufacturers offer the re-build service through dedicated facilities. Location and capability of these facilities are critical since an average mining dump truck engine weighs 20,000 pounds, equivalent to five midsize passenger cars combined.   

Rebuild facilities are located in areas with higher mining activity around the world
Rebuild facilities are located in areas with higher mining activity around the world

Cummins has 16 master rebuild centers around the world capable to rebuild high horsepower engines. The certified rebuild process, from teardown to final inspection, is a detailed 600-step procedure to ensure the highest quality. 

No. 4: Have trained technicians ready for you

Even the most durable engines need planned and, in some cases, unplanned maintenance. Mine sites, with their remote locations, present a unique challenge for technicians to respond in a rapid manner. One-way Cummins addresses this challenge, beyond having 1,000+ trained technicians, is to offer on-site aftermarket support for customers that aim to boost equipment availability. 

The Julong Copper Mine is a great example spotlighting how Cummins goes to great heights by maintaining over 10 aftermarket support team members on site, located at an altitude of 5,500 meters

No. 5: Leverage advanced analytics and telematics

How much money would you have saved if you knew what component to change and when to change it? While you are reflecting on it, take a look at how a Chilean mine operator saved over $1M and minimized downtime by taking advantage of telematics and data-enabled services

Condition-based maintenance, offered through PrevenTech, is at the core of telematics and helps miners improve equipment availability by enabling miners to prevent unscheduled maintenance, and to better plan scheduled maintenance.

“Availability is and will continue to be a key driver for the mining industry to deliver superior financial performance. Miners interested in boosting their equipment’s availability can seek partners that can bring strengths in spare engines and parts accessibility, capable re-build facilities, and readiness of technicians,” said Kevin Spiller, Director of Mining Business at Cummins.

To learn more about mining power solutions Cummins offers, visit our webpage. Follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn to learn more about trends in the mining industry and see how Cummins is powering a world that’s “Always On”

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Redirecting to
cummins.com

The information you are looking for is on
cummins.com

We are launching that site for you now.

Thank you.