National and state parks to visit in each of the 50 states during your next RV vacation

National and state parks to visit during your next RV vacation
National and state parks are perfect getaways for the families interested to discover history and explore nature

RV vacationing has been on the rise in recent years and is expected to increase in popularity, as many seek to generate their new normal with an RV. An RV vacation offers your family expanded personal space both along the way and at the destination. 

This article aims to inspire your next family adventure with an RV, and lists one national or state park to visit in each of the 50 states during your next RV vacation*.

Alabama

Natchez Trace Parkway is where you can enjoy the 444-mile scenic drive, and follow the footsteps of American Indians and European settlers through a historic travel corridor. While not driving, you can enjoy biking and horseback riding too. Height restriction for RVs is 14 feet since there are few bridges with clearances under 15 feet along the parkway.

Alaska

Denali National Park and Preserve is the third largest national park in the U.S. and spreads over six million acres of wildland. It is also home to North America’s tallest peak.The park is very popular among RVers from late May to early September.

Ten most visited national parks in the US

Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park is the second most visited national park in the U.S. and features one of the seven natural wonders of the world: the Grand Canyon. Within the park, beyond the world-famous canyons, lies a little-known Indian Reservation, Supai Village, accessible through hiking and only with advanced reservations.

Arkansas

Hot Springs National Park offers its visitors a variety of experiences including ancient thermal springs, mountain views and forested hikes. While it is one of the smallest national parks, its location within the city of Hot Springs makes it a unique experience for visitors. 

California

Joshua Tree National Park is located at the intersection of two desert ecosystems: the Mojave and the Colorado. The night sky in the middle of the desert offers visitors breathtaking views of the Milky Way.  The park also features 8,000 established rock-climbing routes, making it a destination for climbers all around the world.

Colorado

Rocky Mountain National Park is the perfect destination for visitors interested to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds and spend time within a spectacular mountain environment. Moreover, you can experience Trail Ridge Road, highway to the sky, within your RV. The 48 miles of highway reaches to 12,183 feet elevation and offers visitors thrilling views.

Connecticut

Hammonasset Beach State Park is Connecticut’s largest shoreline park and attracts over a million visitors each year. You can start the day on the land with bicycling and hiking, stroll through the boardwalk and spend the afternoon fishing and sunbathing on the beach.  

Delaware

Cape Henlopen State Park was one of the nation’s first "public land," and was established over 300 years ago. Beyond its history, visitors also come here for beaches, pine-covered dunes and trails. Visitors can also try some of the unique activities including surf fishing and enjoy their time at the disc golf course.

Florida

Everglades National Park, a World Heritage Site, is the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. While many think of the American crocodile as the rare species to see at the park, a few lucky visitors may see the mysterious Florida panther during their visits. 

Georgia

Chattahoochee River National Recreational Area has something to offer to any visitor. You can paddle to enjoy the Chattahoochee River, choose to cycle between the hilly trails and a fitness loop or fish on the river to catch a trout.

Hawaii 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park offers its visitors two of the world's most active volcanoes, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa. One of the most unique experiences the park offers is the hike through the rainforest and the 500-year old lava tube where hot lava once flowed. 

Entrance to a lava tube at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Lava tubes are created by the flow of hot lava centuries ago.
Entrance to a lava tube at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Lava tubes are created by the flow of hot lava centuries ago.

Idaho

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve is a volcanic wonderland with activities that can fit any schedule. If you are just driving by towards your next destination, you can take the scenic 7-mile loop drive or take a couple of hours to hike to Big Craters. If you plan to spend a night, you can camp in the wilderness but would need to plan in advance, since fewer than 100 people a year obtain overnight camping permits.

Illinois

Starved Rock State Park offers its visitors 13 miles of trails to access waterfalls and spectacular overlooks. The canyons in the park feature vertical walls of moss-covered stone formed by glacial meltwater. You can also enjoy time on the water through kayaking, canoeing or fishing.

Indiana

Indiana Dunes National Park is famous among bird watchers where more than 350 species have been observed. Moreover, National Park Service ranks it fourth among all national parks in terms of biological diversity, thanks to over 1,000 plant species existing in the park. The sand dunes, that gave the park its name, rise to almost 200 feet and are located near the park's beaches.

Iowa

Backbone State Park was Iowa's first state park, and offers activities ranging from rock climbing and bicycling to canoeing and hiking to its visitors. While there, you can also investigate the unique masonry work within dams and rustic cabins built by Civilian Conservation Corps.

Kansas

Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve is much more than just grass. You can find over 150 species of birds to watch and a few short trails to catch expansive vistas of this pristine beauty.

Kentucky

Mammoth Cave National Park is home of the world’s longest cave below ground, which extends over 400 miles. If this is not impressive enough, you can also hike through a forest and enjoy the navigable river, which is 20 miles long. 

Louisiana

Fontainebleau State Park is packed with activities for any visitor’s need. You can move around the park by hiking, bicycling and in-line skating. The sandy beach facing the lake is great for relaxation and sunbathing. Birdwatchers can enjoy a variety of bird species thanks to the convergence of diverse ecosystems in the park. 

Maine

Acadia National Park has many unique aspects in what it offers to its visitors and in its history. To begin with, it is the first national park where private owners donated land to the federal government to establish the park. Visitors can enjoy the hikes around the highest point on the Atlantic seaboard, Cadillac Mountain, and be the first to see the sun rise in the U.S. from October to March.

Maryland

Assateague Island National Seashore is where you can enjoy the ocean at the edge of the continent. You can enjoy horseback riding on the beach, hike through the barrier island or discover the bays through crabbing and clamming.

Massachusetts

Cape Cod National Seashore features 40 miles of sandy beaches, marshes and ponds. You can relax on the beach before taking a hike or ride on the seashore trails. A combination of the coast, the wetlands, and the woods create an ecosystem where you can explore over 450 species of amphibians, reptiles, fish, birds, and mammals.

Michigan

Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park is the largest state park in Michigan and  home to roaring waterfalls, rivers and streams. Visitors can hike across 90 miles of trails to access Lake Superior’s shoreline and many other smaller lakes. Many water activities including canoeing, kayaking, boating and fishing are enjoyed by its visitors.

Minnesota

At Voyageurs National Park, water takes the prime spot, where close to half of the park is water: lakes and other waterways. While boating, canoeing and kayaking tend to be the popular activities, visitors can also enjoy hikes where they can see Earth’s oldest rock formations. 

Mississippi

Tishomingo State Park offers its visitors a mix of history and scenic beauty. It is believed that the Paleo Indians have inhabited the area as early as 7,000 B.C. Today, visitors can observe unique rock formations and colorful wildflowers as hike through the trails once walked by Native Americans. 

Missouri

Table Rock State Park bring together water recreation and land-based activities. On land, you can bicycle on paved trails or jump onto one of the mountain biking trails. On the water, you can rent ski boats, paddle boards, kayaks and all the accessories. 

Montana

Glacier National Park is the perfect destination for hikers seeking solitude and wilderness. The park still lives up to its name and features 26 named glaciers, even after completely losing nine glaciers over the last five decades. RVs that are shorter than 21 feet and narrower than eight feet can also travel through the Going-to-the-Sun Road to travel across the Rocky Mountains.

Nebraska

Chadron State Park is Nebraska’s first state park and the perfect destination for mountain bikers with over 100 miles of trails and roads available between the park and the adjacent forest. Visitors can also catch trout or relax in the park’s swimming pool overlooking the pines.

Nevada

Great Basin National Park offers its visitors various experiences ranging from exploring the underground Lehman Caves to hiking up to Wheeler Peak, with a summit at 13,063 feet. The park once hosted the world’s oldest living tree, Prometheus, estimated to be 4,900 years old when it was cut down a few decades ago. It is very likely  there are still many older bristlecone pines across the park waiting for visitors to discover.

New Hampshire

Pawtuckaway State Park has something to offer all visitors. Hiking enthusiast can enjoy trails that feature points of interest such as a mountaintop fire tower. Nature lovers can observe beavers, deer and great blue herons. Families seeking to relax can spend time on the beach next to the lake.

New Jersey

Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park differentiates itself from other parks on this list by offering its visitors a combination of nature and engineering marvels. The park’s centerpiece is Great Falls of the Passaic River. The Great Falls raceway and power system became a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1977, and enabled many innovations ranging from submarines to aircraft engines.  

largest national parks in the US

New Mexico

White Sands National Park offers its visitors views of the world’s largest gypsum dune field with plants and animals unique to this habitat. The park is home to more than 800 animal species, including over 200 species of birds to watch. If you are lucky, you can even see an African oryx, a large antelope native to the Kalahari Desert;  introduced to the areas adjacent to the park in 1970s. 

New York

Adirondack Park is one of the largest parks in the U.S.; in fact, it covers an area equivalent to the state of Vermont. Visitors can stroll around charming villages and quaint towns when they are not exploring the nature. Hiking, paddling, fishing and climbing are some of the more popular activities visitors of the park enjoy. 

North Carolina

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is America’s most visited national park, and offers visitors a diverse ecosystem. You can run into many of the over 100 native tree species during your hike through the ancient mountains.

North Dakota

Theodore Roosevelt National Park impresses its visitors with breathtaking views of the Badlands and the iconic animals such as the American bison, big horn sheep and elk. The park is a special spot for many natural parks lovers, since it was named after Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States and often called "the conservation president."

Ohio

Cuyahoga Valley National Park is famous for the Towpath Trail, where visitors can hike, bike or even ride a horse through it. The trail follows the historic route of the Ohio and Erie Canal, which opened  Ohio to the rest of the settled eastern United States in 1830s. 

Oklahoma

Chickasaw National Recreation Area is a water-lover’s heaven. Visitors can spend time boating, fishing and swimming. Moreover, the park offers great bird watching opportunities, as it is in the Central migratory flyway.

Oregon

Crater Lake National Park is located atop the Cascade Mountain Range and offers its visitors stunning views of the deepest lake in the U.S. The lake is located at a tall peak and the purity of its water is due to being fed only by rain and snow. 

Oldest national parks in the US

Pennsylvania

Ricketts Glen State Park boasts many waterfalls including the 94-foot Ganoga Falls, accessible through the Falls Trail System. Lake Jean offers visitors opportunities for fishing, swimming boating and relaxing on the beach.

Rhode Island

Burlingame State Park offers its visitors a mix of terrains including the woodland, freshwater beach and the Watchaug Pond. A range of activities including mountain biking, fishing, swimming and canoeing are available for visitors. 

South Carolina

Congaree National Park is one of the newest national parks and a great place to experience a floodplain forest. It offers visitors a nourishing ecosystem fed by nutrients and sediments brought by Congaree and Wateree Rivers. Visitors can experience the wilderness through fishing, canoeing, hiking or camping.  

South Dakota

Badlands National Park contains one of the world’s richest fossil beds. Moreover, you don’t need to be a paleontologist to enjoy your time around the fossils. In fact, a seven-year-old from Georgia found a rare museum-quality saber tooth cat skull at Badlands in 2010.

Tennessee

Roan Mountain State Park bring together rich hardwood forests, the beautiful Doe River and the majestic Roan Mountain. Visitors have activities ranging from hiking along the creeks and ridges, and mountain biking to fishing for three species of trout on the Doe River.

Texas

Big Bend National Park’s dark nights are well-known among stargazers; it has the least light pollution of national parks in the lower 48 states. Beyond the nights, you can spend your days birdwatching across different habitats within the park, hiking across desert and mountain trails, or taking a river trip on the Rio Grande.

Utah

Zion National Park is well-known with its scenic canyon views. Meanwhile, the little-known aspect of the park is its diverse ecosystem that hosts over 1,000 species of plants and many species of animals. The park is neighbored by the Mojave Desert, the Great Basin, and the Rocky Mountains; this creates abundant opportunities for visitors to experience diverse habitats. 

Vermont

Woodford State Park is located on a mountain plateau surrounding Adams Reservoir, which is surrounded by a dense forest of fir, spruce and birch. Visitors can relax on the sandy beach or get active with hiking, boating and wildlife viewing. Adams Reservoir is also excellent for trout fishing.

Virginia

Shenandoah National Park is famous among RVers with its Skyline Drive; and there is much more to do while you are in the park. Fishing opportunities are abundant in the park with over 70 mountain streams. There is a hike suited for every visitor’s need across over 500 miles of trails; and the nights could be spent stargazing some of the 2,500 stars visible to the unaided eye. 

Washington

Olympic National Park offers its visitors three distinctly different ecosystems. The temperate rain forests where annual precipitation ranges from 12 to 14 feet. Then comes the glacier-capped mountains including Mount Olympus with a 7,980-foot summit. Finally, over 70 miles of wild coastline featuring beaches, tidepools and off shore sea stacks.

West Virginia

New River Gorge National River park’s centerpiece is the New River, one of the oldest rivers on Earth. Meanwhile, the activities in the park go beyond the water focused activities; visitors can bike along an old railroad grade and hike along the trails.

Wisconsin

Apostle Islands National Lakeshore includes over 20 islands on Lake Superior. It is not a surprise that water activities ranging from paddling to sailing take the centerstage. Meanwhile, hikers can still leverage over 50 miles of trails to explore lighthouses, beaches and scenic overlooks on their way.

Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park is known among climbers and mountaineers that visit the park every year to reach one of the peaks within Teton Range. Visitors can also experience fishing in one of the alpine lakes or paddle the lakes while watching breathtaking views of Teton Range.


National and state parks are perfect getaways for the families interested to discover history and explore nature. Meanwhile, you can generate your new normal with an RV during these trips. Before you start your next RV adventure, consider taking advantage of these additional resources.


* Due to the rapidly changing nature of the current pandemic, some of the parks might face partial or complete closures; please check the parks’ websites for the latest updates.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Cummins Marine powers adventurists around the Great Loop

Bill and Amy Denison
Bill and Amy Denison complete the 6,500-mile journey around the Great Loop

Many mariners have the Great Loop on their bucket list but only a few are lucky enough to accomplish the task. Bill and Amy Denison are one of those few. With great pride, they were able to complete the 6,500-mile journey down the east coast, up the inland rivers and back across the great lakes.

Their journey began on the waters of Maine and Nova Scotia. Bill and Amy cruised along the coast and visited remote islands in their boat, Mar-Kat – a Back Cove 41 named after their daughters, Margaret and Kathleen. They decided that they wanted to venture further and joined the American Great Loop Cruising Association (AGLCA).

After six months of research and planning, the couple said goodbye to friends and family to set off on their journey to tackle The Great Loop. Departing on 15 June 2018, from Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, they headed south. Mar-Kat powered by a 710 horsepower Cummins marine diesel engine and a 9kW Cummins Onan marine generator.Cummins marine powered boat

Over the course of their journey, Bill and Amy travelled across 13 states and the Province of Ontario, going through 100 locks and racking up almost 500 hours on their boat. By completing the Loop in a counter-clockwise direction, they were able to take advantage of the swift river currents.

Bill said, “The Cummins QSM11 engine worked flawlessly throughout the journey and only required a few oil changes.” When service maintenance was required, the couple got in touch with their local distributor and “received good support from the Cummins Virginia team.”

With unique heavy-duty design elements, Cummins small diesel engines have an extended engine life and provide proven acceleration and torque performance. This reliable, four-valve-per-cylinder marine engine is trusted by hundreds of manufacturers and can be found in the engine rooms of pleasure boats all over the world. Additionally, with more than 8,000 dealers and distributors, the Cummins product gives customers the peace of mind that they need, regardless of where their journey takes them.

After successfully completing The Great Loop in 10 months, Bill and Amy are now planning their next adventure with Mar-Kat, maybe exploring Florida or the southern Bahamas. Regardless of where they head next, Cummins will provide the power, innovation and dependability to drive their voyage.

Discover the Cummins marine range at cummins.com/marine, to see how our engines and generators can power your journeys, on sea or by land. 

Need assistance in choosing the right solution for your boat? Find your local Cummins rep

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Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Australia’s landmark hybrid renewable energy microgrid complemented by thermal power generation from Cummins Power Generation

Cummins QSV91G gas generator and QSK60 diesel units support the Agnew Gold Mine's renewable energy microgrid.
Cummins QSV91G gas generator and QSK60 diesel units support the Agnew Gold Mine's renewable energy microgrid.

With an installed capacity of 56MW, the Agnew Hybrid Renewable Power Station became Australia’s largest hybrid renewable energy microgrid – and the first to utilize wind generation at a mine. The energy produced is equivalent to powering 11,500 homes and will abate 46,400 tonnes of carbon dioxide in the first year alone. 

Agnew Hybrid Renewable Power Station, AustraliaWith an installed capacity of 56MW, the Agnew Hybrid Renewable Power Station became Australia’s largest hybrid renewable energy microgrid – and the first to utilize wind generation at a mine. The energy produced is equivalent to powering 11,500 homes and will abate 46,400 tonnes of carbon dioxide in the first year alone. 

“The renewable energy technologies of EDL’s Agnew Hybrid Renewable Power Station are complemented by thermal generation from Cummins gas and diesel generators,” said Jason Dickfos, EDL Head of Growth. “We’re pleased to be working with Cummins to deliver this landmark project, which will provide the Agnew Gold Mine with more than 50% renewable energy over the long term, without compromising power quality or reliability.” 

The hybrid renewable energy solution at the Gold Fields mine in Western Australia consist of a new off-grid 23MW power station incorporating gas, photovoltaic solar and diesel power generation, followed by 18MW wind generation, a 13MW battery and an advanced microgrid control system. A crucial requirement was that the generators had to provide continuous, reliable power at temperatures up to 45°C. The Cummins QSV91G gas generator model was selected due to its ability to operate in high ambient conditions, in addition to providing high impact step loads and fast ramp rates while maintaining power quality, while the Cummins QSK60 diesel units provide additional power during peak periods of demand and have black start capabilities in the event of a power outage. 

Read more about the Agnew microgrid in this case study

Angela Papageorgiou

Angela Papageorgiou is the Senior Marketing Communications Specialist for the Energy Management Segment of Cummins Inc. Prior to joining Cummins in 2014, Angela worked in Marketing Communications agencies supporting the development and execution of B2C and B2B campaign projects. [email protected]

Energy IQ: Three situations that maximize the advantages of cogeneration applications

Three situations that maximize the advantages of cogeneration applications
Three situations that maximize the advantages of cogeneration applications

Greenhouses, hospitals, industrial manufacturers and commercial building owners are some of the many turning to cogeneration, also known as combined heat and power (CHP). They enjoy benefits ranging from improved financial performance to reduced environmental footprint. Cogeneration applications’ high efficiency in converting the energy in the original fuel into useful energy is the foundation of these advantages.

These benefits of cogeneration applications are further amplified under certain situations. Let’s cover these situations and associated examples of cogeneration applications. 

No. 1: Certain aspects of your business operate 24/7

The most cost-effective cogeneration systems operate at full output 24/7. 

This doesn’t mean your whole business needs to run 24/7. Instead, you can identify aspects of your business that run 24/7, and power these with a cogeneration system. Meanwhile, you can still have the utility connection and on-site boilers. These are useful to power the rest of your business operations and to manage potential peaks in electricity or thermal energy demand. Another advantage of using a combination of cogeneration and utility power is around maintenance events. This combination allows you to conduct maintenance and service on your cogeneration system without interrupting access to electricity for your business.

Hospitals are a good example of cogeneration applications for this scenario. Controlling the temperature, managing air quality, keeping the medical equipment operational and many other activities require electricity and thermal energy throughout the day. 

No. 2: The need for thermal energy is consistent; it is also simultaneous with the need for electricity several months of the year

Many facilities leverage cogeneration applications with increasing popularity over the years
Many facilities leverage cogeneration applications with increasing popularity over the years

Selling or storing excess thermal energy is often not practical. Excess heat is commonly released as waste heat, lowering the overall efficiency and financial gains of the cogeneration application. The efficiency of a cogeneration system increases when the thermal needs (steam, hot water or chilled water) stay at a consistent level. The same doesn’t apply as much to electricity needs, since excess electricity could often be sold back to the electric utility.

The longer the simultaneous need for electricity and thermal energy, the more advantageous a cogeneration application is. In fact, a good guidance is to consider cogeneration applications if your business has simultaneous needs for electricity and heating/cooling around half of the year or more 1. There are exceptions to this, and some applications are feasible even when the simultaneous need is 2,000 hours a year, about three months. 

Industrial manufacturing is a good example of a cogeneration application for this scenario. Thermal energy needed in industrial processing tends to be consistent throughout the facility’s operation. Moreover, thermal energy and electricity is usually needed simultaneously throughout the year in these facilities.  

No. 3: Electricity prices are high compared to the cost of natural gas

You are financially better off if producing electricity on-site is cheaper than purchasing electricity from the utility. Many cogeneration systems that produce electricity on-site use natural gas as the fuel, and this is where the spark spread comes into play. 

The spark spread is a metric for estimating the profitability of natural gas-fired electric generators. It is the difference between the price of electricity and the cost of the natural gas needed to produce that electricity 2. As the spark spread increases, savings provided by a cogeneration system also increases. Spark spread is an indicator of financial viability, but it is not an exact measure of profitability. 

Facilities where the cost of electricity is high and natural gas as a fuel is available are good examples of cogeneration applications for this scenario. 

Beyond the factors above, the Evaluating Cogeneration for Your Facility white paper outlines other aspects to consider as you explore cogeneration as an option.  

Sign up below for Energy IQ to receive energy focused insights in markets ranging from data centers and healthcare facilities to manufacturing facilities, and everything beyond. To learn more about cogeneration and trigeneration power solutions Cummins Inc. offers, visit our webpage.

Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

References: 
1 Hamilton, J. (n.d.). Evaluating Cogeneration for Your Facility [Bulletin]. Cummins Inc. Retrieved from https://www.cummins.com
2 U.S. Energy Administration Office (February 2013). An Introduction to Spark Spreads. Retrieved from https://www.eia.gov/
 

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Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Energy IQ: Three energy and power system considerations for edge data centers

Three energy and power system considerations for edge data centers
Three energy and power system considerations for edge data centers

Technologies that require fast computing and low latency are the key drivers of edge computing, and this need for low latency necessitates edge data centers to be near the users they support. Edge data centers are the physical structures where edge computing takes place and are usually located within a few miles from where the data is generated.

Edge data centers, whether located at the base of a cell tower or on-premise at a hospital or factory, will have distinctive energy and power system considerations compared to traditional data centers. This article outlines three of the key energy and power system considerations for edge data centers. 

No. 1: Continuity of computing service will be ensured through redundancy within edge ecosystem and reliability of power systems

One of the advantages of a distributed edge data center ecosystem is that computing workloads can efficiently be moved across a network of nearby edge data centers. Consequently, users can enjoy the continuity of service even when their nearby edge data center suffers an unexpected service downtime. Therefore, edge data centers part of a robust network and able to seamlessly move computing to nearby data centers may require less redundancy in their power systems.

However, power systems’ reliability will be paramount for edge data centers that are not able to seamlessly move computing to nearby facilities without compromising latency requirements. Power systems in these applications will often feature redundant starters and batteries for increased reliability, in addition to state-of-the-art digital monitoring systems to be covered next.

No. 2: Unmanned edge data centers will require state-of-the-art monitoring systems

Many edge data centers will be unmanned, without on-premise facility technicians. Moreover, these data centers will be scattered around cities and towns, making it even more challenging to build a responsive service strategy. This is where state-of-the-art digital monitoring systems come into play. 

Power systems in these edge data centers will feature digital monitoring systems that go beyond the traditional remote monitoring and diagnostics. Often, they will include monitoring systems that provide predictive diagnostics and prognostics with a robust communication and response protocol. These state-of-the-art digital power system monitoring solutions will help operators build a more pro-active service capability.

No. 3: Power systems may be subject to stringent emission and noise requirements

As many edge data centers will be in highly populated urban and suburban areas, they will likely face stringent emission and noise requirements.

Power systems in these edge data centers could deviate from traditional systems depending upon user location. In fact, edge may be the proving ground for power system technologies beyond the historically common approach of supplementing the grid connection with back-up diesel power generators. For instance, natural gas generators with lower emission levels could be preferable in areas with robust pipelines. Solar photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage systems deliver further reduction in emissions and noise levels in areas where there is land availability and solar exposure. Finally, fuel cells could be an option for selected edge data centers. Edge data centers will likely adopt a variety of energy strategies driven by diverse deployment locations and user preferences.

As the industry’s power system needs evolve, Cummins Inc. continues to innovate. These innovations range from continuous enhancements within its diesel and gas power generator portfolio, to innovations in complementary technologies. Cummins’ recent investments in energy storage, fuel cells and advanced microgrid control technologies has boosted its capability to offer comprehensive energy solutions tailored for the data center industry’s emerging needs.

Sign up below for Energy IQ to receive energy focused insights periodically. To learn more about the data center power solutions Cummins offers, visit our webpage.

Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

Raise Your Energy IQ

Grow professionally with energy trends and insights delivered to your inbox. Read about energy technologies and trends on our Energy IQ Hub.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

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