Four Ways to Put Your Tax Refund to Work

Tax season is upon us. The filing deadline is not too far away, and some Americans have already received their refund. With an average refund of $3,000, you may be looking for some ideas on how to use that cash and make a smart investment at the same time.

Here are 4 ways you can put your tax refund to work for you:

Pay Off a Small Debt

Put your tax refund toward paying off a high-interest credit card. Start with the credit card that has the highest interest rate. Doing so will save you much more money in the long run. If you have already paid off your credit card debt, think about making an extra payment on your school loans, car payment or mortgage.

College Fund

Thinking about booking a big vacation? Consider smaller day or weekend trips for the family and invest surplus cash in a fund for future education. Look into 529 plans and Coverdell Education Accounts; these investments offer potential tax benefits as well. Saving for your children's college education now reduces the chances your kids will face heavy student loan debt down the road.

Retirement Savings

As tempting as it may be to purchase that brand new 80+ inch curved TV, consider making small adjustments in your savings plans that will reap huge benefits later. Increase contributions to your 401K plans and take advantage of the matching opportunities your employer has in place. If you already invest in a 401K, think about contributing to an IRA or Roth IRA account.

Home Improvements

Small investments to your home can increase its value tenfold. With the wide range of improvements you may be thinking about – from a new tile backsplash to a new garage door, consider investing your refund in a home standby generator. In fact, the return on installing a standby generator is even greater than adding a bathroom!* Power outages can strike at any time and standby power means immediate restoration of electricity to your home. Cummins home standby generators are safe, permanent backup solutions for your home. Connected to your home’s gas line, they automatically turn on the moment an outage strikes and run powerfully, quietly and efficiently until the outage is over. They’re simply the best choice for backing up your home and ensuring your peace of mind. Use our personalized calculator to determine your unique power needs.

For more home improvement tips, check out smart home expert Eric Murrell’s suggestions to improve your home. And be sure to sign up for the Cummins Home Generators newsletter to get valuable resources to help your family weather the storm, safely and comfortably while saving money.”

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Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Energy IQ: Five tips to manage your home’s energy use while staying at home

Cummins - Energy Tips While Working From Home

COVID-19 continues to impact many aspects of our lives. Many are now required to stay at home in an effort to curb the spread of the pandemic. One of the many implications of staying at home will be the changes in your home’s energy usage. 

Historically, a family on average incurs $200 of energy bills a month in the United States. As many families around the world are required to stay at home, their home energy bills are expected to temporarily rise. 

Below are five practical tips to reduce your home’s energy consumption, but before we get into these tips, let’s cover the basics around understanding your current energy use at home.

Understanding your current home energy use 

Maintaining indoor temperatures, heating water, providing lighting and operating your refrigerator take up most of the energy used in homes. Many residential households rely on electricity and natural gas as the energy sources to power these and other amenities. 

Cummins - Share of energy use by household tasks
Few activities take up most of the energy used in homes. For many homes, electricity is a primary form of energy. 

In recent decades, electricity has been the rising star in bringing energy to our homes. It kept gaining ground to first surpass the use of petroleum, and more recently to surpass the use of natural gas as the primary form of energy in households.

Beyond these aggregated trends, your home and family’s energy needs are unique, and you can check your local utility provider’s web site to understand your home’s energy usage. 

Staying and working from home likely changes your energy use pattern

The amount and timing of energy we use throughout the day at home changes, let’s call it your daily energy use pattern. Commonly, energy use in residential dwellings peaks in early evening as more of us return from work to home, get dinner ready, watch TV, and adjust the indoor temperate to a pleasant level. Energy use bottoms during night hours as heating or cooling tends to be the only energy user. 

Cummins - Average hourly residential electricity load
Our daily electricity usage pattern is likely changing as many are required to stay at home. 

As many are required to stay at or work from home, this daily energy use pattern will likely change. It is expected the energy usage during daytime hours will increase considerably. This will be a result of more family members being present at home when they are normally at work or school. This will create the need for additional heating or cooling, more frequent use of hot water and increased appliance usage. The energy usage will likely increase during evening hours too, but a much less significant increase in comparison to the increase during day hours. 

Five practical tips to manage energy use while you and your family are at home

  1. Heating and cooling tend to be the largest consumer of energy. If you need heating, consider lowering your thermostat by a degree or two to reduce your energy bills. Where applicable, you can keep your curtains or blinds open to take advantage of sunlight for heating. For the rooms not frequently used, you can consider adjusting air vents to decrease hot air flow into these rooms and close their doors. If you need cooling, consider raising the temperature by a degree or two and using fans to help circulate the air. 
    Cummins - Five practical tips to save energy
    Five practical tips to manage your energy bills while staying at home. 

     

  2. Refrigerators tend to be the appliance that consume the most electricity. Consider challenging yourself and your family to not open the refrigerator door as frequently. As many are required to stay at home, this means more people making frequent trips to the refrigerator for food and snacks. Consider setting up a family challenge; tape a piece of paper on the fridge door and put a mark every time someone opens the door, award the family member that opened the door the least.
  3. Lighting continues to consume a considerable amount of energy in households, even after all the recent improvements in energy efficient lighting. Consider taping the switches in the off position for the rooms with minimal usage. This will help you and everyone in the home avoid leaving lights on during the day in selected rooms. If you are an early riser and like working in the morning while it is still dark outside, consider setting an alarm on your phone to turn off all lights after sunrise so you don’t forget. If you have recently invested in smart home technology, consider setting schedules for your light fixtures to automatically turn off at preset times. 
  4. Heating water for showers, the dishwasher and washing machine is another area that consumes a sizable amount of energy. Consider lowering the water heater temperature towards the lowest setting, and consolidating your washing loads to minimize the times the washing machine runs. Replicate the same with your dishwasher too. 
  5. Many of your home electronics continue to use electricity while they are turned off or in standby mode, hence the phrase ‘phantom loads’. Consider unplugging these devices while they are not in use. These devices include TVs, stereos, game consoles, cell phones, computers, computer accessories and beyond.

This is a very difficult time for everybody and the world is joining together to keep people healthy first and foremost. As many are required to stay at or work from home, we can all put an effort to manage our individual energy footprint. 

Sign up below for Energy IQ to periodically receive relevant energy insights and trends from Cummins Inc. Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

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Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Energy IQ: How working from home impacts the energy footprint

Cummins - Energy IQ - Working from Home - Energy footrpint

This is a very difficult time for everybody, but make no mistake we will get through this together.

COVID-19 continues to impact many aspects of our lives. While the health and safety of the world Is everyone’s top priority, the short and long-term impact of COVID-19 will also be seen across different industries. Even after this is over, our healthcare systems, hospitality and entertainment sectors, and many other industries will face new and different operating realities. 

Similarly, the energy sector is also adjusting to a world with COVID-19. This article outlines the three immediate impacts of COVID-19 and associated national lockdowns and stay-at-home orders on our energy footprint, with a special focus on electricity.  

No. 1: World’s electricity consumption is likely to decrease briefly

As more nations implement lockdowns to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the lockdowns also impact our electricity consumption. On one side, our residential electricity consumption will likely increase as more of us are required to work from home. More lighting, cooking, heating or cooling all result in an increased use of residential electricity. On the other hand, industrial shutdowns are expected to significantly reduce our industrial electricity use. 

Cummins - Electricity Final Consumption by Sector
Industrial electricity use exceeds other sectors' use, while electricity use has been consistency increasing.

Electricity is an increasingly key form of energy we use to keep our lives ‘Always On’. The world’s electricity production has already doubled between 1990 and 2015, and we are expected to use twice more electricity by 2050. 

This longer-term trend is expected to continue with a brief pause occurring during the next couple of months.

It is likely the reduction of electricity consumption within the industrial sector will be greater than the increase of electricity consumption within the residential sector. This will likely lower the global electricity consumption for a few months, followed up with an increase as businesses go back to their regular operating rhythm. 

No. 2: Existing renewable sources to make up a higher portion of our electricity generation in some geographies

As some of the industrial sector temporarily scales down, this changes the electricity demand in terms of the amount and when the electricity is needed, or the electric load profile. This will likely reduce the need for some of the dispatchable, fossil fuel power plants. Higher fuel and operating costs incurred by these fossil fuel power plants will likely be another reason they experience reduced utilization.

Cummins - Electricity generation by source
Some of the countries with stringent measures to control COVID-19 also have high share of renewables in electricity production

Meanwhile, the renewable energy sources will continue to generate at the same rate, essentially allowing them to make up a higher percentage of base electricity generation.

Some of the world’s largest economies have made good progress in increasing their mix of electricity generation from renewable sources. Given the COVID-19 lockdowns are a global issue, this shift in energy mix will affect all  major economies on some level.

No. 3: Our electricity infrastructure is flexible enough to accommodate this unexpected change

A diverse mix of central generation plants and distributed energy resources (DERs) increases the flexibility of our electricity infrastructure. This flexibility accommodates the changes in electricity demand by leveraging different components of the electricity infrastructure. In some cases, interconnections between regional grids or demand response is leveraged to deliver the needed flexibility. In other cases, adjusting the utilization of thermal power plants or local microgrids is leveraged. 

It is expected many of us won’t experience any significant interruptions in access to electricity during the on-going COVID-19 crisis, thanks to the built-in flexibility within our electricity infrastructure. This benefit of resiliency, enabled by a diverse generation infrastructure, will potentially have a lasting impact on energy system planning going forward.  

This is a very difficult time for everybody and the world is joining together to keep people healthy first and foremost. Once this is over, many people and businesses will be operating under new realities. Recent improvements within the energy sector, including increased flexibility of our infrastructure will help us power through this immediate challenge without major issues.

The implications of the current pandemic will potentially change future energy planning too. While there are many unknowns about its long-term impact, including business and personal behaviors, COVID-19 could likely change the general commercial and residential approach to preparedness. 

Sign up below for Energy IQ to periodically receive relevant insights and trends about energy markets. To learn more about the distributed generation solutions Cummins Inc. offers, visit our webpage.

Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

For health, safety, and medical emergencies or updates on the novel coronavirus pandemic, please visit the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and WHO (World Health Organization). You can also learn more about Cummins' response to the pandemic

Raise Your Energy IQ

Grow professionally with energy trends and insights delivered to your inbox. Read about energy technologies and trends on our Energy IQ Hub.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Energy IQ: From decarbonization to on-site generation, three energy trends for data centers

In 2017, a group of researchers estimated global data centers could use 25% of the world’s electricity by 2025 1. This is more electricity than any country in the world, including the U.S. You would be happy to hear this prediction is not materializing so far and you might be wondering, ‘how much energy and electricity data centers consume?’

The world’s data centers consume around 200 Terawatt-hours (TWh) of energy annually, almost all of it is electricity 2; this is about 1% of the world’s electricity consumption. While this is much lower than the prediction above, it still makes data centers a considerable consumer of energy. However, the data center industry has made significant progress to improve their energy efficiency. This has resulted in data center energy consumption to plateau in recent years. What is even more exciting is the industry’s ability to achieve plateauing energy consumption while successfully meeting its customers increased need for services. 

Global Data Center Energy Usage Plateaus
Global data centers energy usage plateaus

Now that the basics around data centers’ energy usage are covered, let’s move into the three data center energy trends you would likely hear more frequently in the years ahead.

No. 1: Increasing environmental consciousness is driving a focus on decarbonization

From airlines to data centers, lowering carbon emissions and decarbonization are increasingly getting traction across most industries. In the process of using 200 TWh of electricity, data centers create a significant carbon footprint. This is because they commonly rely on the world’s current power generation mix, which is still heavily fossil fuel based.

Two of the most popular decarbonization paths within the data center industry are the direct use of renewable energy sources and the use of renewable energy credits (RECs).

  • Direct use of renewable energy sources: This is where a data center is fully or partially powered by renewable energy e.g. geo-thermal, hydro, solar, and wind. While this is the more environmentally beneficial approach, it is also more challenging due to the intermittent nature of renewables. Data center operators rely either on existing electricity markets or in some cases, energy storage options to manage this challenge.

Direct use of renewable energy sources

  • Use of renewable energy credits (RECs): In this scenario, the data center operators purchase renewable energy and associated RECs. In cases where the renewable energy is produced in a location far away from the data center, the operator sells the renewable energy back to the grid and uses RECs to offset its carbon footprint. This is a common approach across the data center industry, and partially what makes Google the largest corporate buyer of renewable energy in the world 3. Here is how this approach is beneficial: it gives the renewable energy provider the customer commitment to invest in new projects, even if the renewable energy is not necessarily used by the data center. In other words, this approach delivers an increasing amount of renewable energy to the grid for all of us to use. Meanwhile, critics highlight that this approach doesn’t necessarily reduce the data center’s carbon contribution.

These two approaches are expected to co-exist in the data center industry’s path towards decarbonization.

No. 2: An increase in on-site energy generation

Data centers commonly rely on the grid as the primary source of electricity. While relying on the grid is convenient, the continued expansion of data centers could put extra stress on existing grid infrastructure causing grid instability. In some regions, data center growth and energy demands could outpace grid infrastructure capability and investment. To address these challenges, some data center operators may deploy on-site power generation.

Photovoltaic (PV) arrays, natural gas generator sets, and fuel cells are common sources of on-site generated power. These sources are also known as distributed energy resources (DER) and may operate connected to the utility or isolated from the utility (known as island operation) as a microgrid. Stationary energy storage may also be incorporated into a microgrid enhancing the ability to operate isolated from the utility.

On-site power generation allows a data center operator to use power from cleaner sources when available, while supplementing energy from other sources when the cleanest source is not sufficient. This feature of on-site generation supports advancement towards sustainability goals while maintaining reliable power service to the data center.

No. 3: Rising focus to achieve higher levels of energy efficiency

Data centers offer vast opportunities for energy efficiency, and the industry has taken full advantage in recent years. Let’s cover two aspects of energy efficiency in a data center.

  • IT infrastructure: Historically, data centers improved energy efficiency of IT infrastructure through higher utilization of individual IT equipment and server virtualization. Going forward, converged infrastructure (CI) and hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) are expected to lead energy efficiency gains in data centers. Simply put, CI features building blocks made up of storage and compute functionalities physically combined in a turnkey product. Meanwhile, HCI relies on a software to combine compute, storage and networking functionalities. Both technologies, in different ways, deliver a more scalable architecture helping with energy efficiency. Within a data center, to deliver the same computing output, you can afford to have fewer servers, storage and network equipment if you are using one of these technologies.
  • Non-IT infrastructure: Power usage effectiveness (PUE), the ratio of total energy used by the data center to the energy used by computing equipment, is a common indicator of a data center’s energy efficiency. The industry average PUE has improved from 2.5 in 2007 to 1.67 in 2019 4, a clear indicator of shrinking contribution of non-IT infrastructure, heating, cooling, lighting and others, in a data center’s energy consumption. Going forward, advancements in cooling systems will take center stage in energy efficiency gains within non-IT infrastructure. Natural cooling, where cool ambient air or chilled water from nearby resources are used to cool the facility, will impact the geographical locations of data centers. Additionally, an increased prominence of liquid cooling technologies will impact data center cooling system designs. Meanwhile, on the IT infrastructure, the expanding need for IT equipment to operate at higher ambient temperatures will reduce the need for cooling per computing capacity.

It is expected facility and energy professionals leading comprehensive energy efficiency plans covering IT and non-IT infrastructure will stay ahead of their peers in energy efficiency gains.

Sign up below for Energy IQ to receive energy focused insights periodically. To learn more about the data center power solutions Cummins Inc. offers, visit our webpage.

Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

References:

1 Lima, J. M. (December 12, 2017). Data Centres Of The World Will Consume 1/5 Of Earth’s Power By 2025. Data – Economy. Retrieved from https://data-economy.com/

2 Global data centre energy demand by data centre type. (January 7, 2020). International Energy Agency. Retrieved from https://www.iea.org/

3 Pichai, S. (September 19, 2019). Our biggest renewable energy purchase ever. Google. Retrieved from https://www.blog.google/

4 Lawrence, A. (May 2019). Is PUE actually going UP?. Uptime Institute. Retrieved from https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/

Raise Your Energy IQ

Grow professionally with energy trends and insights delivered to your inbox. Read about energy technologies and trends on our Energy IQ Hub.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Energy IQ: Hybrid clouds to edge computing, trends that will shape the data centers industry in this decade

Cummins - Data Center Trends

We take a look at five trends that will influence the future of the data center industry in our latest Energy IQ article. 

If you look back to the last decade and reflect on a few trends that have shaped the data center industry, it is likely you might think about the increase in hyperscale data centers and the rise of cloud. Looking into the decade ahead, the data center industry is still on track to continue its growth pattern. In fact, cloud computing market is estimated to grow by 18% a year within the first three years of the decade 1. Meanwhile the trends that will shape the industry through this growth will be different than the previous decade.

Trends shared in this article are aimed to keep your perspective of the future of data centers fresh as you continue to shape the data center industry. Let’s look at these five trends that will influence the data center industry this decade..

No. 1: Hybrid clouds to increasingly become the top choice for most enterprises

The rise of cloud started in the 2000s and rapidly took off within the world of data centers the following decade. Meanwhile, this decade will be shaped with the rise of hybrid cloud. 

Private and public clouds offer different benefits to the users. Users of private clouds enjoy higher levels of security and customization to fulfill their regulatory needs and unique circumstances. On the other hand, users of public clouds enjoy relatively lower costs and on-demand scalability. Meanwhile, hybrid clouds bring a combination of these benefits with manageable shortcomings. 

Cloud strategies and hybrid clouds for enterprises
Hybrid clouds are increasingly becoming the top choice for enterprises. 

A hybrid cloud is when a company combines the use of a private cloud for mission-critical workloads and a public cloud for less sensitive workloads. Companies using hybrid clouds can still have higher security for mission-critical workloads and leverage lower cost public clouds for less sensitive workloads. They key shortcoming of a hybrid cloud is the compatibility between the public and private clouds, however, this could be effectively managed. 

These benefits make the hybrid cloud the top cloud strategy among enterprises. In fact, 58% of enterprises are pursuing it, in comparison to 51% the year before. The hybrid cloud is expected to continue its rise through this decade.

No. 2: Growth in edge computing, fueled by IoT and enabled by 5G, will complement, not replace, the cloud 

Increased use of Internet of Things (IoT) devices is one of the key drivers behind the expanding need for edge computing. Meanwhile 5G comes to play as one of the technologies that enable edge computing. 

Businesses from healthcare to manufacturing are increasingly using IoT devices, and expect very low latency in their operations. In these cases, it is not acceptable to produce the data, send it thousands of miles away to be processed and receive back the processed data. As 5G adoption speeds up, it will exponentially increase the amount of data generated by IoT devices, thus worsening the latency issues. Interestingly, this is not an issue restricted to businesses, as our homes feature more IoT devices, and more of us are driving autonomous cars, each of us will generate more data and expect it to be processed with low latency. Imagine having a smart bulb and having to wait 5 seconds to turn it on after using the smart light switch or the app on your smart phone.

Edge computing could address this need for improved latency by bringing the computation resources much closer to end users and their IoT devices. This growth in edge computing won’t necessarily replace the cloud, instead the combination of the edge and cloud will result in a more capable digital and physical infrastructure. 

No. 3: Talent shortage will arise in new geographies and existing talent will experience a shift in skills

The first International Data Center Day, powered by 7*24 Exchange International, intentionally aimed to inspire the next generation of talent as the talent gap for data centers continues to widen. Beyond  the sheer growth of the industry, the two trends covered above are driving this expanding talent gap. 

As the need for edge computing increases, new data centers are being built in new geographies to get closer to the end users and their IoT devices, while improving the latency. This creates the need for data center talent in cities and towns that didn’t previously have any significant data center footprint. However, when it comes to the rise of hybrid clouds, the situation is a little different. Operating data centers supporting hybrid clouds require a combination of both software and hardware related skills, as hybrid clouds bring both together. 

On the other hand, the rise of artificial intelligence (AI) will likely help data center operators build smarter data centers where certain tasks are managed by AI, easing the talent shortage to some extent.

Talent shortage, whether it is talent in new geographies or new skills existing talent needs, will shape the coming decade. This will bring opportunities for cloud providers and their enterprise customers to collaborate more closely in cross training talent to expand their skills.

No. 4: Energy efficiency and environmental impact will get increasing attention

While the power usage effectiveness (PUE) of data centers continue to improve from 2.5 in 2007 to 1.67 in 2019 3, signaling increasing efficiency, data centers are still consuming a large amount of energy. In fact, it is estimated data centers collectively consume more energy than the world’s fifth largest economy, the United Kingdom 4
Meanwhile, keep in mind the  world’s energy and electricity are still primarily produced by fossil fuels and 38% of the electricity is from coal, one of the worst offenders in carbon emissions. Between data centers’ high energy consumption and our dependence on fossil fuels, you might not be surprised to hear that data centers generate about 2% of the world’s carbon emissions. 

World's electricity product by source - Cummins
The world's electricity continues to be produced primarily by fossil fuels. 

In addition to carbon emissions, water usage is forecast to get more attention as a part of the broader sustainability umbrella. On the other hand, there is some good news for data centers too. A range of developments ranging from converged technologies to cooling architecture changes are forecast to enable data centers to become more energy efficient. “Energy trends in data centers” brings more details on the energy future of data centers, including a look at carbon offset credits.

No. 5: Security was important and will be important, but for evolving reasons

We have debated whether the list should start with security or end with it. Security was always important for data centers and would be on this list whether we focus on 2000s, 2010s or 2020s.

If you go back a decade ago, regulatory needs kept security top of mind for data center operators. More recently, financial consequences of security breaches became a key driver, and the regulatory aspect became more of a table stake. 

In the decade ahead, two aspects of security will take the center stage. First is the life-threatening aspect of security breaches. Think of the consequences of security breaches in data centers that support the operation of autonomous cars or healthcare IoT applications. Second is the security challenges introduced by edge data centers. Edge data centers will be smaller in size and likely won’t have local personnel, and the industry will need to find solutions to address security in these unmanned sites.

While there seems to be no end to the growth in the data center industry, the profile of growth will change during this decade. Whether it is increasing the adoption of hybrid clouds or the rise of edge computing, it will be an exciting decade for all stakeholders of the industry. Insights shared in this article are aimed to keep your perspective of the future fresh and current as you continue to shape the data center industry.

Sign up below for Energy IQ to receive energy focused insights in markets ranging from data centers and healthcare facilities to schools and manufacturing facilities, and everything  beyond. To learn more about data center power solutions Cummins offers, visit our webpage.

Think your friends and colleagues would like this content? Share on LinkedIn and Facebook.

References: 
1 Cloud Computing Market by Service, Deployment Model, Organization Size, Workload, Vertical And Region - Global Forecast to 2023. (February 2019). ReportLinker. Retrieved from https://www.reportlinker.com/
2 Global Cloud Index Projects Cloud Traffic to Represent 95 Percent of Total Data Center Traffic by 2021. (February 2018). Cisco. Retrieved from https://newsroom.cisco.com/
3 Lawrence, A. Is PUE actually going UP?. (May 2019). Uptime Institute. Retrieved from https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/
4 Danilak, R. Why Energy Is A Big And Rapidly Growing Problem For Data Centers. (December 2017). Forbes. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/

Raise Your Energy IQ

Grow professionally with energy trends and insights delivered to your inbox. Read about energy technologies and trends on our Energy IQ Hub.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

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