Making a splash at NACV

Cummins hydrogen fuel cell truck
Cummins unveiled a heavy-duty demonstration truck with fuel cell and battery electric power at the 2019 North American Commercial Vehicle Show.

Drip. Drip. Drip. It may just be tiny droplets of water dribbling out of Cummins’ latest innovation, but it is making a big splash this week at the North American Commercial Vehicle Show (NACV) in Atlanta. Building upon a long history of innovation and delivering industry-leading solutions, Cummins is displaying the newest development in the powertrain of choice: hydrogen fuel cell power. 

Unveiling in a Big Way

After many months of behind the scenes work, which is really the culmination of more than 20 years of research and development around fuel cell technologies, Cummins has unveiled a heavy-duty truck with fuel cell and battery electric power. The zero-emissions class 8, 6x4 day cab tractor is a technology demonstrator suitable for vocational applications, including regional haul, urban delivery operations, port drayage and terminal container handling. 

Under the Hood

The truck was designed and integrated by Cummins in Columbus, Ind. and includes a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell from Hydrogenics, a recent addition to the Cummins family. The truck was designed for 90 kW fuel cell and is scalable in 30 kW or 45 kW increments up to 180 kW and has 100 kWh lithium-ion battery capacity. The truck has a range of 150-250 miles between filling up, but that range can be extended with additional hydrogen tanks, increasing the tank storage pressure or installing additional fuel cells to optimize management of the vehicle load factor. 

Cummins hydrogen fuel cell truck
Cummins' hydrogen fuel cell truck, pictured here, was designed and integrated by Cummins in Columbus, Indiana. 

Many of the critical components of the powertrain, including the PEM fuel cell, system controller, powertrain controls, wire harnesses and junction boxes, among others, were designed and developed by Cummins. Cummins has also integrated third party components into the system. 

The Look 

Some might be surprised by the overall look of the fuel cell truck – it doesn’t feature any Cummins red! Instead, the exterior truck branding prominently showcases water. The meaning behind this is twofold. First, when the fuel cell is running, the exhaust consists of air and water. Liquid water flows out from an outlet hose behind the side panels on the driver’s side. Second, hydrogen can be sourced from water using a process called electrolysis to produce electrical energy. The use of water, along with the Jeopardy-style answer of “Hydrogen is how.” to the question of “How does it work?” helps to distinguish the hydrogen fuel cell technology that is unique to the vehicle.

The second thing you’ll notice about the truck is the OEM, or more accurately the lack thereof. The truck was not a collaboration with an OEM partner and was deliberately designed to be OEM agnostic. The goal was to allow all OEMs customers and end users to envision how Cummins fuel cell power can enable their success. 

Without looking under the hood, the truck might look like any other truck, and in fact, the goal is to provide the same dependable performance as every other Cummins-powered truck. So, even though we never intend to manufacture the truck itself instead focusing on innovating the powertrain, having an OEM-neutral vehicle that showcases the art of the possible through a modern, innovative “package” is important to the overall positioning of the technology. 

The Team Behind the Innovation

To say this was a team effort would be an understatement. The truck was designed and built at the Cummins Machine Integration Center (CMIC) in Columbus. The facility supports global vehicle integration efforts for multiple business segments for on- and off-highway equipment and features a dedicated EV Lab for electrification work. More than 30 engineers and technicians, including a few from Hydrogenics who jumped in post-acquisition, and numerous suppliers had a hand in taking this from simply a concept, to a truck that could be driven onto the tradeshow floor.

The truck is a example of the collaboration between system engineering, technology leadership teams within Electrified Power and Cummins research and technology group and the technical operations team at CMIC which supports Cummins Southern Indiana fleet of 450 vehicles. 

Cummins hydrogen fuel cell truck

Looking to the Next 100 Years

Cummins’ strategy is to provide our customers with a range of power options, from advanced diesel and natural gas internal combustion engines to battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell solutions. In the long-run, the customers we serve will likely need more than one type of power, depending on their specific markets, applications and use cases. 

To this end, Cummins has made several recent announcements around fuel cells like the acquisition of Hydrogenics, a memo of understanding with Hyundai Motor Company to collaborate on hydrogen fuel cell technology across commercial markets in North America and an investment in Loop Energy, a fuel cell electric range extender provider. Developing the hydrogen fuel cell truck as technology demonstrator is a critical step in gaining valuable insights that are critical to continue developing the right solutions for the market and preparing for next 100 years. 

So, the next time you hear a drip or step in a puddle, take a minute to think about the possibilities. 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Cummins PEM electrolyzer will supply hydrogen in Denmark, Europe, demonstrating strong hydrogen capabilities

Cummins PEM electrolyzer will supply hydrogen in Denmark, Europe

Cummins and its partners announced that HyBalance, one of Europe’s most advanced hydrogen production facilities, will continue producing hydrogen for customers across Europe. HyBalance was established in 2018 as a pilot, and the pilot was completed in September of 2020, demonstrating strong results.

“Hybalance is a leading example to other customers and communities that the future of power can be dependable using our water electrolysis capabilities,” said Amy Adams, Vice President Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies at Cummins Inc. “As the first-of-its kind, the facility demonstrated that PEM electrolysis technology is highly dynamic and flexible in terms of power fluctuations, and is able to balance the electrical grid to better utilize renewable energy. This is a tremendous step forward in Cummins’ capabilities and continues to build our reputation as a hydrogen technology leader across multiple applications.”  HyBalance PEM

HyBalance was funded by Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking and the Danish EUDP program, and led by Air Liquide, Cummins (through its Hydrogenics Business), Centrica Energy Trading, LBST and Hydrogen Valley.

Located in Denmark, the HyBalance proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer supplies hydrogen to customers of Air Liquide, a world leader in gases, technologies and services for Industry and Health, and Air Liquide operates the site. The project demonstrated that producing hydrogen to store energy at a large scale – including electricity from renewable sources – is technically and economically viable. In addition, the facility has validated the PEM electrolysis technology as highly dynamic, able to cope with fast power ramps up and down. Since 2018, the 1.2-megawatt PEM electrolyzer has produced 120 tons of hydrogen, enabling 24/7 delivery of 60 tons of hydrogen to an industrial customer and demonstrating its ability to balance the electricity grid. The remaining 60 tons have been delivered to other customers, including hydrogen stations for fuel cell taxis in Denmark’s capital city, Copenhagen. 

Hydrogen makes other forms of renewable energy more viable by providing efficient and portable storage of electricity. Sourcing power from wind turbines, the PEM electrolyzer can economically convert wind energy to hydrogen and oxygen in a process called water electrolysis. Hydrogen is produced when electricity prices are low which is typically the case when wind energy is abundant. Then, the hydrogen can be stored or transported easily to customers. 

“Air Liquide is proud to have contributed to the success of the HyBalance project. Clean hydrogen being a major key lever for a carbon neutral world, the plant will keep delivering low-carbon hydrogen to customers,” Pierre-Étienne Franc, Vice-President for Hydrogen Energy, Air Liquide. “The facility is already a model for larger scale PEM electrolyzers around the world including another Air Liquide plant located in Bécancour, Québec with a 20 MW electrolyzer, to start soon.”

Electrolyzers enable the production of hydrogen, which can be used by industrial clients or stored and used to power applications, including trains, buses, trucks and more. Cummins has hundreds operational in the field. Water electrolysis produces no harmful emissions — only oxygen and hydrogen. And when hydrogen is used to power a fuel cell electric vehicle, only pure water is released. 

Denmark is on the cutting edge of clean power. In 2019, 47% of electricity consumed in Denmark came from wind power, compared to just 6.6% in the U.S. By converting electricity into hydrogen, the HyBalance project helps balance the grid and allows excess electricity to be stored and used at a later time in the industrial sector or as clean fuel for transportation. The facility in Denmark is capable of supplying a fleet of more than 1,000 fuel cell electric vehicles.

In September 2019, Cummins acquired the Hydrogenics Corporation, which provided Cummins with PEM fuel cells as well as alkaline and PEM electrolyzers used to generate hydrogen. Cummins continues to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of producing and storing hydrogen at scale, and this first-of-its-kind electrolyzer marks an exciting success for both Cummins and hydrogen fuel cell technology at large. The HyBalance project has paved the way for PEM electrolyzers around the world, including the world’s largest PEM electrolyzer—Cummins 20-megawatt PEM electrolyzer located in Bécancour, Québec. The PEM electrolyzer, which is being built in partnership with Air Liquide, will be the largest of its kind in the world with an annual hydrogen output of approximately 3,000 tons.

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Cummins: Making a splash with these hydrogen headlines

Cummins Hydrogen Day news roundup
Fresh on the heels of our virtual Hydrogen Day event, we've compiled a roundup of some of the latest headlines making waves in the hydrogen fuel cell space

As a company focused on serving its customers and all its stakeholders, Cummins rarely seeks the spotlight.

But the recent focus on hydrogen  - and its place in helping decrease the negative impacts of climate change and decarbonizing the power sectors - has caught the attention of many journalists and thought leaders from around the world. And rightfully so. 

Is hydrogen the future? Only time will tell, but as we highlighted during our recent Hydrogen Day virtual event, we certainly think the future looks bright for hydrogen and its place in helping build a green economy

Here’s a roundup of some of the latest headlines making waves in the hydrogen fuel cell space.  

Diesel engine giant Cummins plans Hydrogen future with trains coming before trucks, Forbes 

Cummins is starting to ditch diesel for hydrogen, Fox Business

Why Jim Cramer is watching Cummins stock, TheStreet.com 

Cummins outlines the future of Hydrogen technologies, Transport Topics 

Cummins believes in the future of Hydrogen. Nikola stock is the one that jumped, Barron’s 

Cummins: New technologies on the horizon, H2View 

Cummins lays out vision for a hydrogen future, Truck News 

Cummins sees $400M in revenue from making hydrogen in 2025, Freightwaves 

Cummins drives ahead with hydrogen, International Construction 

Cummins outlines hydrogen plans, Just Auto

Cummins looks to the future, details hydrogen power development plans, Fleet Equipment Magazine

Cummins hydrogen power systems and electrolyzers aiming at trains first, Hydrogen Fuel News

Cummins details hydrogen power development plans, Engine Builder

Cummins reveals road map to Carbon-free Hydrogen economy, HDT Truckinginfo

katie zarich author bio photo

Katie Zarich

Katie Zarich is Manager of External Communications for Cummins Inc. She joined the Company in 2015 after more than a decade working in government and the nonprofit sector. [email protected]

Cummins celebrates first European Hydrogen Week with a look-back at hydrogen and fuel cell successes in Europe

Cummins celebrates first European Hydrogen Week with a look-back at hydrogen and fuel cell successes in Europe

Hydrogen will contribute significantly to the transition to clean technology in Europe, and across the world. In July, the European Commission announced its hydrogen strategy to explore the potential of clean hydrogen to help the process of decarbonising the EU economy in a cost-effective way, in line with the 2050 climate-neutrality goal, set out in the European Green Deal. To match the interest and importance of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the energy transition, this week the first European Hydrogen Week takes place. 

At Cummins, we are proud of our ability to innovate and scale hydrogen fuel cell technologies across a range of commercial markets. September marked the one-year anniversary of the acquisition of Hydrogenics, which expanded Cummins alternative power solutions to include fuel cell technologies and hydrogen production capabilities. In addition, just last week Cummins held its Hydrogen Day event, where it revealed the potential of a decarbonised future fuelled by hydrogen. As we look to the future, we see many new possibilities and opportunities to better serve our customers and our planet. 

To celebrate the first European Hydrogen Week, join us as we look-back at Cummins’ successes in fuel cell and hydrogen technologies in Europe. 

 

Cummins to open new fuel cell systems production facility in Germany, strengthening its commitment to hydrogen in EuropeNorway’s Largest Grocery Wholesaler Gives Hydrogen a SpinCummins Delivers Fuel Cells for Refuse Trucks in EuropeHenok's focus on quality makes him the perfect fit

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Three Cummins hydrogen production facilities that are helping build a green economy

Hydrogen elctrolyzer

To decrease the negative impacts of climate change and decarbonize the power sector, renewable technologies like wind and solar have emerged as key ingredients to providing a solution. But integrating these intermittent energy sources into the power grid can be challenging. This is where electrolyzers come. Hydrogen makes other forms of renewable energy more viable by providing efficient and portable storage of electricity. Electrolyzers enable the production of hydrogen, which can be used by industrial clients or stored and used to power applications, including trains, buses, trucks and more, and Cummins has hundreds operational in the field.  

Take wind turbines as an example. Electrolyzers can economically convert wind energy to hydrogen and oxygen in a process called water electrolysis. Water electrolysis produces no harmful emissions — only oxygen and hydrogen. Hydrogen is produced when electricity prices are low which is typically the case when wind energy is abundant. Then, the hydrogen can be stored or transported  to customers. Hydrogen’s potential for storing and transporting energy makes it a key enabler of a global transition to renewable energy. 

Cummins made a bold entry into the hydrogen economy in September 2019 with the acquisition of Hydrogenics, a global hydrogen fuel cells and electrolyzer technology manufacturer, and Cummins continues to make quick progress in innovating new products and applications in the hydrogen space, including three electrolyzers that are making an impact:  

HyBalance – Denmark: Supplying clean hydrogen to 1,000 fuel cell vehicles  

HyLYZER PEM ElectrolyzerCummins, along with its partners, established this 1.2-megawatt proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer site more than two years ago in Denmark. The site supplies clean hydrogen to customers of Air Liquide, a world leader in gases, technologies and services for Industry and Health, with Air Liquide operating the site. The PEM electrolyzer in Denmark is capable of supplying a fleet of more than 100 fuel cell electric vehicles per day and could contribute up to 0.5 percent of the transport sector greenhouse gas reduction targets in Denmark. 

Douglas County – U.S.A.: Enabling utilities to store excess energy 

Expected to be operational in 2021, this 5-megawatt PEM electrolyzer located in Douglas County in Washington state (U.S.A) will be the largest, as well as first of its kind in use by a public utility, in the United States. The new renewable hydrogen facility allows the Douglas County Public Utility District (PUD) to manufacture commercial hydrogen using electrolysis to harvest hydrogen from water from Wells Dam on the Columbia River. Cummins’ PEM electrolyzers, like Douglas County PUD’s electrolyzer, enables utilities to store the excess energy that they would typically sell off to the market at a financial loss, or not harness at all, and instead store that energy to sell into a new green hydrogen market. Additionally, it creates a way for utilities to engage in new market opportunities outside of their typical service area, removing growth barriers often faced in the industry. This project is made possible by legislation passed in Washington state in 2019, which authorized public utility districts to make and sell hydrogen. 

Becancour – Canada: Building the largest PEM electrolysis plant in the world 

Cummins is in the final stages of commissioning the largest PEM electrolysis plant in the world in Becancour, Canada for Air Liquide. The 20-megawatt facility will have an annual hydrogen output of approximately 3,000 tons. The electrolyzer will use renewable hydroelectricity to generate decarbonized, and green, hydrogen. The facility is planned to be operational in the coming months.   

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

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