Near zero emission natural gas engine expands reach outside U.S.

The L9N Near Zero emission engine is being tested in Santiago, Chile's capital city.
The L9N Near Zero emission engine is being tested in Santiago, Chile's capital city.

Cummins, the global power leader offering customers a broad portfolio of solutions, is propelling a bus in Chile with the company’s L9N Near Zero emission natural gas engine, the first application for the engine outside the United States.

The L9N, considered one of the world’s cleanest internal combustion engines, can significantly reduce particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The 320-horsepower engine is powering a bus through Santiago, Chile’s capital city, on a  test basis.

“We are proud to present our Cummins L9N gas engine in Chile, which will significantly contribute to reducing greenhouse gases and decontaminating the

The L9N powered bus in Santiago, Chile
The L9N Near Zero emission natural gas bus is ready to demonstrate its environmental benefits on the streets of Santiago, Chile.

city of Santiago,” said Fábio Magrin, General Manager of Cummins Chile. “We endeavor to bring our customers the right power solutions for the work they need to do. The solution found in Chile is in line with our mission to make people’s lives better by powering a more prosperous world.”

GRABBING ATTENTION

The announcement of the Cummins gas-powered bus was attended by the Chilean Minister of Transport and Telecommunications, Gloria Hutt, and generated interest from the Chilean news media. Much of the coverage highlighted the engine’s potential to help improve the environment in the country.

“Natural or renewable gas-powered engines can be incredibly clean and efficient,” said Luís Pasquotto, Vice President of Cummins Brazil  and the leader of the company’s engine business in Latin America. “With increasing gas abundance and a mature technology requiring relatively simple infrastructure investment, these engines are a great solution for many customers and markets, including in Latin America.” 

A RECORD OF SUCCESS

Cummins delivers natural gas solutions that are reliable, durable and efficient. The 80,000 Cummins natural gas engines currently in use offer dependable, clean and quiet performance, as well as low emissions, high efficiency, low total fuel costs, and reduced dependence on imported oil.

With 100 years of experience and technology leadership, Cummins innovates for a future with energy diversity and will continue to deliver the right technology at the right time for every customer.

The inside of the bus testing the L9N in Chile
The inside of the test bus is ready for customers.


 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

How smart is the worksite of the future ?

Worksite of the future

The worksite of the future will see site managers using digital technologies as integrated components to drive business results, with the Internet-of-Things and machine learning becoming more than just buzz words.   

In this post we’ll explore how connectivity combined with intelligent site planning and the right equipment can improve productivity, while reducing costs and improving safety. We’ll also explore why adoption of the latest technologies has been slower than expected and what the potential challenges site managers and industry leaders need to consider when designing their own infrastructure. 

As the world transforms into a truly digital economy, strong and reliable connectivity will be paramount for the site managers to benefit from the many opportunities available to them. The good news is with Wi-Fi, cellular and satellite offerings, there are no shortage of options when it comes to selecting internet sources or telematics providers. Whether it’s flying drones, remote diagnostics, virtual service events, autonomous operators or smart charging for electric equipment. Once connectivity is prioritized as a requirement of the worksite, a new way of working becomes possible.   

For example, imagine the productivity you could achieve if equipment never failed while on a job because its engines were being monitored remotely through cloud computing systems that can detect issues early and send software updates (similar to your smart phone) to fix problems. Or, automatically trigger replacement part orders online so preventative maintenance could occur with minimal steps or time lag.     

Alternatively, what if you knew exactly how much work you could get done with an electric machine before its battery needed charging and then you could plan your charges during downtime to not only save on utility costs but also ensure availability during regular work shifts? Similarly, how much risk could you mitigate if you utilized autonomous operators who directed equipment from computer rooms instead of working on site? The common thread here for these examples is connectivity. 

With advanced hardware and sensors now being increasingly added to construction equipment- machines are in fact collecting data and learning the way sites work. These anonymous insights apply machine learning to help manufacturers design more and more advanced technologies. However, here within lies the heart of the challenge. Let’s consider a simple example where a construction site has 12-pieces of equipment from 3 OEM brands.   

Each brand could have its own telematics solution installed and ready, meaning that the site manager may need to monitor their mixed fleet through 3 different web portals.  This could negate a notable amount of the expected efficiency gains. For machines without factory installed telematics solutions, external service providers can visit sites and add aftermarket hardware to upgrade equipment. This solution must of course pay for itself in the long run.    

And then of course these new sets of technology do require new skills. This could mean upskilling current labor or hiring new talent. Data management will be one of the key skills, without it the amount of information could prove overwhelming.

While challenges do exist, Cummins is building open and agnostic technology solutions that are connectable with a range of telematics service providers and customer specific systems. As our powertrains are found in a wide variety of construction equipment, we are developing a suite of Connected Solutions™ to help support customers over the life of their equipment.     

Learn more and join the conversation

Join the conversation with #Cummins on your social platforms or learn more about our current and future product solutions. We also have Cummins experts around the world happy to answer your questions. Find your nearest Cummins professional by visiting care.cummins.com or calling 1-800-Cummins.

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Repurposing methane produced from landfills for a more sustainable refuse market

Cummins Renewable Natural Gas

It’s no secret that trucking markets around the world are calling for cleaner fuel alternatives. In 2018, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the Clean Trucking Initiative to “ensure emissions reductions occur in the real world in all types of truck operation.”

With a specific reference to heavy-duty trucks and their impact on the environment, the refuse market has a unique opportunity to increase their use of renewable resources. How? By capturing and reusing landfill gases.

Landfills are an extreme threat to the ozone and are responsible for emitting raw methane gases. Raw methane gas is 40 times more potent than tail pipe exhaust and will remain trapped in the atmosphere for hundreds of years. But on the flip side, methane emissions from landfills also represent an undervalued opportunity to seize and repurpose a significant energy resource. 

Once methane is produced, it can go through three different levels of treatments in order to repurpose the gas in a productive manner. The primary and secondary treatments remove moisture and impurities, respectively. If these two steps are completed, the gas can be used to generate electricity in power generation plants. If the methane undergoes a third treatment to remove CO2, N2, O2, and VOCs (as needed), it can be reused for vehicle fuel as renewable natural gas (RNG). 

Renewable Natural Gas landfill process

This process creates the opportunity for a full life cycle of natural gas landfills. Waste companies, like Waste Management, are sending RNG-powered trucks to your neighborhood to collect waste and recycling. The material collected is then deposited into landfills and over time produces methane. That methane becomes a RNG through the cleansing process and then fuel to power the natural gas powered trucks that collect the waste. Cummins’ natural gas engine line already produces emissions 90% lower than EPA requirements; adding this fuel type further reduces Waste Management’s vehicles to net sub-zero emissions! 

On a larger scale, there are also opportunities for waste companies to funnel their RNG from landfills into the national natural gas pipeline network. The U.S. natural gas pipeline system totals over three million miles of pipeline across the country, providing natural gas to factories, hotels, city-owned facilities, convention sites, airports, commercial ship and motorized vehicle refueling sites, and finally into residential homes across the country. 

While both RNG and fossil natural gas share the same pipeline, the year-over-year expansion of injecting RNG into the pipeline will continue to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. To further encourage the growth and use of RNG in the United States, the EPA established the Renewable Identification Number program (or RIN). Fleets who contract the purchases and use RNG from authorized brokers receive full Greenhouse Gas reduction credits when pulling natural gas off the pipeline. 

It seems like a perfect solution. Is that because it is? Landfills, dairy farms, livestock farms and sewerage treatment plants all produce raw methane naturally. Capturing this abundant energy source and converting it to a very affordable energy source, then coupling it with Cummins’ renewable natural gas engine delivers net sub-zero emissions goods movement today. 

Next question, please. 

Learn more about Cummins natural gas solutions.  

Sources
Environmental Protection Agency: https://www.epa.gov/lmop/basic-information-about-landfill-gas 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Digging Deeper: Two aspects of improving productivity of mining operations

Digging Deeper: Two aspects of improving productivity of mining operations

Let’s define productivity as getting the job done faster, and increased productivity helps miners do more with less. In the mining business, productivity is sometimes less space being consumed by an engine, leaving room for more payload or less time to accelerate, thus maximizing the number of trips a day. 

Miners have several opportunities to improve their operational productivity; below focuses on two opportunities most relevant to increasing productivity of equipment ranging from haul trucks to excavators. 

No. 1: Extended maintenance intervals deliver higher productivity

Service intervals achieved at Dawson Mine through new filter technology
Service intervals achieved at Dawson Mine through new filter technology

The longer miners can run their equipment, the higher their productivity is. In most cases, mining equipment operates near continuously through days, weeks and months, and this creates the need for periodic maintenance events for filters, fluids and beyond. In this quest towards higher productivity, even these periodic planned maintenance events are open to questioning. 

Dawson coal mine in Queensland, Australia had firsthand experience of productivity gains, a 74% reduction of maintenance hours, with the use of new filter and telematics technologies from Cummins Inc. A combination of advanced analytics and telematics have helped the mine operator extend service intervals for fuel, lube, water and air filters and for lube oil. 

No.2: Engines capable to do more with less even in most extreme conditions

Miners are familiar with extreme conditions whether it is the elevation, temperature or accessibility, and understand how these conditions impact the performance of their equipment. For instance, reduced oxygen in high altitude locations result in losses in engine power; resulting in overall reduced mine productivity. Loss of engine power could lead into more trucks doing the same work or work being done slower, and neither are good solutions. More trucks would mean increased carbon footprint while doing the work slower means low productivity. 

Cummins engines accept the challenge of  extreme conditions  in a variety of applications at China’s largest copper mine site. Located at an altitude of 5,500 meters, higher than the base camp for Mt. Everest, the Julong Copper Mine features over 65 Cummins engines powering excavators, dump trucks, power generators, drillings and bulldozers. Haul trucks powered by Cummins QSK60 engines have continuous uptime in this severe environment, making it the top engine of choice at Julong.

“The mining industry will continue to find solutions to improve the productivity of its operations. Some of these, such as the extended maintenance intervals and engines capable to do more with less, will help miners both on sustainability and productivity fronts, a double gain for the industry,” said Steve Cummins, Director of Mining Business at Cummins.

 

To learn more about trends in the mining industry follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn. To learn more about mining power solutions Cummins offers, visit our webpage. To learn more about how Cummins is powering a world that’s “Always On,” visit our webpage.

Aytek Yuksel - Cummins Inc

Aytek Yuksel

Aytek Yuksel is the Content Marketing Leader for Cummins Inc., with a focus on Power Systems markets. Aytek joined the Company in 2008. Since then, he has worked in several marketing roles and now brings you the learnings from our key markets ranging from industrial to residential markets. Aytek lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with his wife and two kids.

Machine of the Month: Apache AS1250XP Sprayer

Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer with a B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine
The Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer with a B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine

Sprayers: They're big, they're versatile and they're one of the most valuable pieces of equipment for today's farmers.

One of the most important machines in the modern row-crop production cycle is the sprayer. From helping prepare the ground prior to planting, to applying fertilizer during key points in the growth cycle, a sprayer is a valuable piece of equipment for today’s farmers. 

The Apache AS 1250 XP sprayer by Equipment Technologies (ET), which is powered by either a 260 or 300 horsepower (HP) B6.7 Cummins Performance Series engine, is one of the most efficient on the market. 

"With the new Performance Series engines, Apache sprayers receive a performance boost of up to 15 percent due to the increased power and torque available throughout the engine speed range," said Veera Rajendran, Vice President Engineering, ET. "They are also more productive on the farm, saving farmers eight percent in fuel with an overall combined fuel and Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) saving of three percent. Not only does this have significant environmental sustainability benefits, it also lowers operating costs – which is a big win for our customers," he added.

With a boom of up to 132 feet, a 1200 gallon product tank, a crop clearance of 50 inches and weighing 22,500 pounds (lb.), the Apache AS1250XP is the largest sprayer in the AS family. This sprayer can tackle an array of conditions in almost any field. 

In addition to the size and power needed to tackle any type of field condition, the AS family of sprayers are an Equipment Watch™ four-time award winner for highest retained value across all product categories.  
 

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

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