Nor'easters and Hurricanes: Three Reasons Why These Equally Devastating Cyclones Are Different

We are hearing the term “nor’easter” a lot in the news lately… in fact, a fourth nor’easter hit the eastern U.S. late last week, leaving 50,000 people in New Jersey without power. Images and video are terrifying, showing damage on the scale of a hurricane. While these infamous storms can be just as destructive as a tropical cyclone, they are different types of storms… and it all has to do with when and where that storm is born.

How do they differ?

1. Location, location, location. 

  • Hurricanes form over the warm waters in the Atlantic Basin as tropical cyclones. Because tropical cyclones get their energy from the latent heat released from warm ocean waters, they are born with a warm core.
  • Nor’Easters form when cold dry air from the north meets up with warm moist air from the south – creating a clash of air masses which release the energy needed to create a mid-latitude cyclone. Due to the nature of how and where they form, mid-latitude cyclones are inherently cold.  

2. The science of the matter.

  • Hurricanes have their strongest winds near the surface and are typically much smaller than nor’easters. While they can have devastating impacts when they make landfall, they tend to hit smaller areas hard.  
  • Nor’easters have their strongest winds towards the top of the storm – which is why many flights were cancelled during recent nor’easters. A nor’easter is roughly 4 times larger than the size of a typical hurricane–meaning nor’easters impact a much larger piece of real estate!

3. The dangers they bring.

  • Hurricanes tend to cause flooding, wind damage and flying projectiles, dangerous surf, downed trees and powerlines, beach erosion, and power outages.
  • Nor’easters can bring on whiteout conditions, dangerous icy roads, unpredictable blowing snow drifts, gusty winds, rough seas, ice damage to trees and powerlines, and power outages. 

The bottom line: Nor’easters are just as dangerous as hurricanes. Due to geography and time of year, they bring different types of precipitation, but both can cripple regions for days or even weeks. Impacts from both hurricanes and nor’easters are felt near and far. Power outages from both kinds of storms can leave you in the dark for days… and sometimes even weeks or months. Don’t be left in the cold. Consider investing in a Cummins standby generator to ensure you and your family are prepared when the next major storm arrives. 

Cummins home standby generators are safe, permanent backup solutions for your home. Connected to your home’s gas line, they automatically turn on the moment an outage strikes and then run powerfully, quietly and efficiently until the outage is over. They’re simply the best choice for backing up your home and ensuring your peace of mind.

Cheryl Nelson, Certified Broadcast Meteorologist

Cheryl Nelson

Cheryl Nelson is an Emmy-nominated and AP award-winning Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, TV Host, FEMA-Certified Instructor and Weather and Preparedness Advisor for Cummins. You can visit Cheryl’s website at www.CherylNelson.net and follow her on Twitter and Facebook @CherylNelsonTV. 

Building a Disaster-Proof Smart Home

The Smart Home

When thinking about the logistics of building a smart home, it’s important to keep in mind all areas of your home and how they impact your everyday life. Is your home up-to-date with technology?

Do you know what you need to keep your family safe year-round? Being strategic when upgrading your home will make living easier after the renovations are complete. 

There is no better time than now to upgrade your home. Picking out the right tools and services for your smart homes can protect you and your family from pending storms and natural disasters that can knock out power for days, even weeks. 

In his newest blog post, Eric Murrell, founder of the smart home and technology blog “At Home in the Future,” shares key tips on what to keep in mind when building your smart home. Learn more on Eric's blog: Building a Disaster Proof Smart Home. 

 

Photo of Eric Murrell

Eric Murrell

Eric Murrell is the founder of the smart home and technology blog “At Home in the Future” and has been a passionate fan of the future since he was seven. He’s a web developer by trade, and serves as the Director of Communication and Technology for a large non-profit in Nashville, Tennessee. In Nashville,  he and his family are building a high tech home in the woods. 

Chile Hosts Cummins Power Systems Latin America Conference For The First Time

Conference presentations addressed the future of the region
Conference presentations addressed the future of the region

A conference in Santiago, Chile has deepened distributor relationships and helped Cummins Power Systems spread the word throughout 16 Latin American countries.

 

Cummins Power Systems Latin America held a distributors conference for the first time in Chile. The event, held May 21-24 in Santiago, was attended by more than 80 representatives from 20 distributors in 16 Latin American countries. 

The theme for four days of presentations, workshops and debates was entitled "Embracing the Future." Past and Future of Power Generation, Power Generation Growth in Latin America, Distributed Generation, Controls and Systems, Marketing, Aftermarket and Digital, Prime, Standby, Data Center and Order Management were just some of the presentations given by leaders of Power Systems global and Latin America.

The event also featured presentations of successful projects in distributors’ countries, and a Next Steps Workshop where participants were divided by regions (Brazil, Mexico, BUPA, NSA, WSA and Central America) to discuss future ideas and needs in Latin America. The conference closed with a dinner party at a restaurant with a beautiful view of the city of Santiago de Chile, not to mention a visit to the winery Cousiño Macul where participants could learn about the production of Chilean wines – and sample them.

Distributor representatives came in from across Latin America

Distributor representatives came in from across Latin America

Distributor response was overwhelmingly positive. Juliana Passos, director of Brazilian distributor DCCO, said the conference exceeded her expectations and encouraged participants to think “out of the box” and experiment with new practices in search of continuous improvement. Eduardo Castrillon, General Manager of Colombian distributor Tecnodiesel, said the conference was positive and productive.

For Andreas Wiener, director of Indusur, distributor from Ecuador, the experience of sharing time with Cummins was a motivator. It allowed distributors to understand global energy market trends and be more familiar with Power Systems products and brands, he said, adding: “This has given us a path to greater alignment with Cummins.”

Fabio Balesteros, Power Systems Latin America’s Aftermarket Solutions manager, concluded: “For me, the event was a milestone in Cummins history. For the first time we gathered all Latin America Distributors and leading Power Systems leaders, discussing not only how we are today, but also debating the company’s strategies for the future.” 

Fabiana Menezes

Fabiana is the Corporate Communications Specialist for Cummins Power Systems Latin America. She graduated in Journalism and has pursued a career in Corporate Communications with ten years' experience at multinational companies from different sectors. She joined the company in February, 2018. 

Cummins Customers, Distributors and Employees from Brazil Attend Fly-In Power Seminar

Group members attend the Fly-In Power Seminar in Minneapolis
Group members attend the Fly-In Power Seminar in Minneapolis

The diverse mix of 20 customers, managers and distributors from Brazil who attended the 2018 Fly-In Power Seminar in Minneapolis, Minnesota, incidentally set an unexpected record. 

 

Cummins Power Systems brought together a group of 20 individuals from Brazil for the company's 2018 Fly-In Power Seminar in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the end of April. The group comprised a balance of members, including representatives of distributors, customers from across a variety of segments, and members of the Power Systems Latin America team.

Fly-In Power Seminars provide technical knowledge and learning tools relevant to the power generation industry by country. The training is conducted by Cummins engineers and experts and aims to improve participants’ professional development and connect them to the latest information and technologies that contribute to more reliable and economical energy projects and systems.

The program included a tour of the Cummins Power Systems Plant, a walk-through of various production lines, live demonstrations of Cummins power systems – including paralleling, simulation and remote monitoring – and a visit to the acoustic center in Shoreview. 

This year’s Fly-In was a chance to show Brazilian customers how Cummins values team work globally, according to Kyn Barbosa, Application Engineer for Power Systems Latin America.

“It was a great opportunity to get to know more about Cummins, to get closer to other areas and, especially, to understand how we can better help our customers through our work”, she said.

Cummins Brazil 2018 Fly-In
A group of 20 individuals from Brazil - including customers, distributors and Cummins employees - attended Cummins' 2018 Fly-In Power Seminar in Minneapolis, Minnesota

For the first time, the majority of the group for this year’s Fly-In were women, who outnumbered the men by 11 to nine. Luciana Giles, Cummins Latin America’s Director of Marketing and Communications, commented: “It was a privilege to have the presentations and the presence of so many female engineers. The gender diversity we have in our organization contributes to a superior outcome and brings different visions to the business." 

For Patrícia Freitas, Equinix Infrastructure buyer, the Fly-In experience has contributed to her work and allowed her to appreciate the quality of Cummins products.

“It was surprising from start to finish," Freitas said. "It was amazing to see the factory, equipment assembly line and acoustic testing center, and interact with the fantastic Cummins team and with the other participants from different companies. It was great to know how important it is to have Cummins on our list of partners. Thank you for the opportunity." 

Fabiana Menezes

Fabiana is the Corporate Communications Specialist for Cummins Power Systems Latin America. She graduated in Journalism and has pursued a career in Corporate Communications with ten years' experience at multinational companies from different sectors. She joined the company in February, 2018. 

How to Protect Your Pets Before, During and After the Storm

After more than 100,000 pets were left behind when their owners evacuated New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, President George W. Bush signed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act in 2006 requiring state and local municipalities to include pets and service animals in their preparedness plans.

Despite these measures, countless pets were still lost or abandoned in 2017 during one of the most damaging hurricane seasons in history.

When extreme weather hits, pets can get loose, scared and lost. It’s often difficult to find them after. As you prepare for the severe weather conditions, don’t forget to plan for your pet’s safety.

Prepping Before the Storm

Put together your pet’s emergency kit, including:

  • Food and water to last one week.
  • A photo of you with your pet as proof of ownership if they go missing. If your pet is microchipped, make sure that their information and tags are up-to-date. If your pet is not microchipped, now is a good time to do it.
  • A copy of your pet’s vaccination records, current rabies vaccination tag and any medications your pet may be on.
  • A sturdy carrier or extra leash and collar.
  • Extra waste bags and/or litter box.
  • A favorite toy or two for comfort.
  • Research which local shelters allow pets. Contact the shelters in advance about pre-registering and any special requirements. If you own any exotic pets such as reptiles or birds, make shelter arrangements in advance.

During the Storm

  • Don’t let your pets drink or swim in floodwater as there can be bacteria and toxins.
  • Be sure to bring your pets inside before the storm starts.
  • Consider keeping your dogs leashed or your cats in cages or carriers to keep them from running off and hiding.
  • Make sure your pets are wearing collars with securely fastened, up-to-date identification. If you will be separated, include the phone number and address of your temporary shelter.
  • Be sure to stay as calm as possible as pets can sense fear. The calmer you are, the calmer your pet will be.

After the Storm

  • After the storm has passed, don’t let pets roam freely. Fences and power lines could be down, and other hazardous materials could be on the ground.
  • If your pet was lost or scared during the storm, check them carefully for injuries. Make sure to treat any minor scratches or cuts and take them to a veterinarian for an evaluation.
  • If there is damage to your house or yard, keep your dog on a leash until they reorient themselves as their surroundings may seem unfamiliar to them.
  • To help your pet recover and get back to resuming a happy life together, return to your normal routine as quickly as possible.

Severe weather can lead to power outages that can last for days or even weeks which could mean no air conditioning in hot summer months. Installing a generator or back-up power supply will help provide cooler temperatures for your pets. Prepare for the worst and have peace of mind during severe weather and install a Cummins QuietConnect home standby generator.

Cheryl Nelson, Certified Broadcast Meteorologist

Cheryl Nelson

Cheryl Nelson is an Emmy-nominated and AP award-winning Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, TV Host, FEMA-Certified Instructor and Weather and Preparedness Advisor for Cummins. You can visit Cheryl’s website at www.CherylNelson.net and follow her on Twitter and Facebook @CherylNelsonTV. 

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