Cummins Working to Power Hurricane Victims in Florida and Puerto Rico

Cummins generators are helping power the Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan, which is functioning both as a shelter and the command center for the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Cummins employees have been working to bring power to storm-ravaged areas of Florida and Puerto Rico since the first of two hurricanes began striking parts of the Caribbean last month.

While the storm response has stabilized in Florida, the company is actively working to help bring electricity to key parts of Puerto Rico, where roughly 80 percent of residents were without power as of Oct. 19.

The company, for example, is frequently servicing three Cummins generators at the Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan, home to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) command center on the island as well as the largest shelter in the U.S. territory for those displaced by the storms. The generators, installed before Hurricanes Irma and Maria struck, have been running around the clock.

Teamwork has been key to the company’s work both in Florida and Puerto Rico. Cummins deployed 13 technicians from elsewhere in the Distribution Business Unit to support Florida customers during Hurricane Irma. For the response to Maria, four more technicians from other locations in the company have been deployed to Puerto Rico, with plans for more to meet customers’ overwhelming needs.

Cummins worked with one of its large supermarket customers in the U.S. to get a container of supplies to employees in Puerto Rico who have been working long hours to support local customers, and then filled a second container with supplies donated by company employees for their colleagues in San Juan.

Cummins’ President & Chief Operating Officer Rich Freeland and Jenny Bush, Vice President of Sales & Service – North America, issued a company-wide note this week thanking all employees responding to recent natural disasters not just in Florida and Puerto Rico, but in Texas, Mexico and India, too.

“Recent natural disasters across the globe have impacted our employees and their families in devastating ways,” Freeland and Bush said in the note. “In response, our people have exemplified and lived the value of caring, making a real difference during such difficult times.”

Cummins employees fielded many calls and braved the elements to help customers. Here are just a few examples:

  • An Orlando, Florida-based team worked with the company’s West Palm Beach branch to help Martin County install a generator to keep its emergency radio system running in the critical hours after Hurricane Irma struck.
  • Cummins’ West Palm Beach and Miami branches worked together to locate, deliver and install a generator as Hurricane Irma was arriving for a customer needing to maintain power for medical reasons.
  • Multiple Cummins teams in the days after the storm collaborated to quickly repair a utility truck headed to one of the hardest hit areas of Florida.
  • Cummins teams across that state sent pallets of water with daily parts deliveries to aid customers and their communities hit hard by Irma.

The company has also been working with Save the Children organization to raise thousands of dollars for disaster relief. Save the Children is dedicated to giving children a healthy and safe start in life as well as the opportunity to learn.

People in hurricane-affected areas in the continental United States who need support with power generation can contact the company’s customer care team at 1-800-CUMMINS (1-800-286-6467). For those in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean locations, the team can be reached at 1-305-821-4200.

“While saying ‘thank you’ doesn’t feel sufficient, we can assure you it is genuine,” Freeland and Bush said in their note to employees. “Thank you for giving. Thank you for asking how you can help.”

Caption: Cummins employees unload supplies at the company’s distribution location in Puerto Rico. The facility is in relatively good shape and employees are working long hours to help restore power on the island.

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Four Reasons Clean Diesel is in Cummins’ Toolbox to Meet Climate Goals

 Cummins has been active in efforts such as the Super Truck program to improve the efficiency of diesel trucks
Cummins has been active in efforts such as the Super Truck program to improve the efficiency of diesel trucks

Many companies are pursuing electrification as a potential answer to the world’s climate goals, including Cummins. But that doesn’t mean diesel, specifically clean diesel, can’t play an important role, too. 

Here are four reasons clean diesel technology is part of Cummins’ broad portfolio of products designed to help customers meet their environmental sustainability goals:

1.    CLEAN DIESEL IS A PROVEN TECHNOLOGY

The Diesel Technology Forum  (DTF), a group dedicated to raising awareness about the importance of diesel, defines clean diesel  as the combination of today’s ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, advanced engines and effective emissions controls.

Together, these elements result in a highly efficient, virtually smoke-free engine, which can achieve near zero emissions and reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs).Clean diesel technology evolved around the year 2000 and has made a significant difference in air quality. Independent studies show it would take 60 18-wheel trucks produced today to equal the emissions of just one 18-wheeler built before 1988.

Yes, clean diesel uses petroleum-based fuel, but the technology is much more efficient than gasoline engines and much cleaner than pre-2000 diesel engines. According to the DTF, you can find a growing number of new-technology diesels in use today. More than a third of the trucks on U.S. roads are powered by the newest, cleanest, most efficient diesel technology, the group says.

Photo from the Jamestown Engine Plant
Cummins’ Jamestown Engine Plant in Jamestown, New York (USA) has produced more than 2 million engines since the company acquired it in 1974.
 

2.    CLEAN DIESEL IS AVAILABLE RIGHT NOW

Cummins and other companies are working hard to make electrified powertrains available for all kinds of trucks as soon as possible. Cummins has pledged to get an all-electric powertrain on the market for urban buses by the end of 2019. 

But it’s going to take time to develop electrified options for the full range of on- and off-highway engines. Products have to be developed. Factories built. Employees trained and supply chains established. 

While great progress is being made in reducing the size and cost of batteries, there’s still a way to go in many markets  Clean diesel is ready now. The plants are built and the supply chains established. Cummins’ Jamestown Engine Plant in Jamestown, New York (USA), recently passed the 2 million-engine milestone. You gain a lot of expertise after building that many engines.

3.    CLEAN DIESEL HAS AN ESTABLISHED INFRASTRUCTURE

Diesel fuel and service is widely available. According to the DTF , 55 percent of retail fuel locations in the U.S. offer diesel fuel, and various truck stop directories list between 6,500 and 7,000 locations across North America – many offering diesel fuel and service. Three out of four commercial vehicles are powered by a diesel engine and almost 99 percent of large Class 8 trucks come with a diesel engine. So finding fuel and service is not a problem.

By comparison, electrification infrastructure is just starting to develop. Plug-ins can occasionally be found for cars in urban areas, and some U.S. cities are experimenting with electric cars for hire. But a lot more has to be built before the majority of buses and delivery trucks go electric, and even more before electric 18-wheelers can travel coast to coast in large numbers. Europe is closer, but even there it’s going to take time.

One of the reasons Cummins is focusing first on electrification efforts for urban buses is the company believes that’s where the infrastructure will develop first. 

A Cunmmins' QSK95 engine is installed in the Siemens' Charger locomotive
Cummins’ ultra-low emissions QSK95 engine is prepared for lowering into one of Siemen’s Charger Locomotives.

4.    CLEAN DIESEL OFFERS A NICE RETURN ON CLEAN AIR INVESTMENTS

Return on investment is a key question as the debate begins in the U.S. over how best to use a $2.9 billion Environmental Mitigation Trust, part of the VW settlement, to improve air quality. Some argue these funds can best be used to help build the infrastructure for electrification.

The DTF, however, maintains the fastest and most cost-effective gains can be made by strategically replacing older and larger diesel engines in locations with the greatest potential for air quality gains. Through a partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund, DTF found that upgrading just one of the oldest, dirtiest tug boats in an urban area would be like taking tens of thousands of passenger vehicles off the road each year. And it says repowering an old railroad switch engine with clean diesel technology can remove the same amount of nitrous oxides (NOx) for about half the cost of other options.

Cummins believes every customer’s situation is just a little bit different. For example, a transit system that has access to a supply of renewable natural gas like the Los Angeles County, California (USA) transit system might choose to use that as a fuel. LA's transit system is using Cummins Westport’s near zero natural gas engines to help power its fleet, essentially taking advantage of a naturally occurring waste product to reduce its use of fossil fuels.

As the only independent engine maker building natural gas, electric and clean diesel engines, Cummins wants to help its customers make the right decision for them. Cummins believes the environment is too important to remove any tool that might make a difference. 
 

 

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Three Ways Cummins Can Help Communities in Search of Clean Air

AEOS, Cummins' all electric concept truck, is unveiled to the public in 2017. It is helping Cummins study the use of electrification in larger trucks.
AEOS, Cummins' all electric concept truck, is unveiled to the public in 2017. It is helping Cummins study the use of electrification in larger trucks.

Many government officials in the U.S. are looking for ways to best use the $2.9 billion Environmental Mitigation Trust included in the VW settlement to help improve air quality in their states and communities. There’s a lot to think about to get the most out of the settlement fund.

With its broad product portfolio, Cummins is uniquely positioned to help public officials figure out what’s best for their states and communities, taking into account their unique circumstances. The fund can be used to repower or replace vehicles, address shore power for ports, build out electric vehicle charging stations or expand other emissions reduction programs.

Here’s a quick look at how Cummins can help:

Charger locomotive
The low-emissions Siemens’ Charger locomotive, powered by a Cummins QSK95 engine, undergoes testing before being put into service in 2017.

CLEAN DIESEL POWER

Nobody knows the benefits of clean diesel engines like Cummins. The company makes diesel engines of all sizes and types, which is critically important to making a good decision. The Diesel Technology Forum, a non-profit group dedicated to raising awareness about the importance of diesel engines, says replacing a few large, older diesel engines with the latest diesel technology can have a much bigger impact on air quality than replacing a lot of smaller engines.

Removing one older locomotive switch engine, for example, and replacing it with a modern, clean diesel engine removes about the same amount of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a key contributor to smog, as replacing the engines in 29 older delivery trucks or taking 30,000 car off the road for a year.

Cummins’ massive QSK95 engine is winning praise for the low-emissions power it’s bringing to Siemens’ new Charger locomotives, now in service in passenger trains from Florida to Washington state. The company’s new X15 engine, meanwhile, is among the cleanest the company has ever built, powering everything from heavy duty trucks to a variety of off-highway equipment. And those are just two of the diesel engines Cummins makes with the latest technology to ensure low emissions.

AEOS concept truck
A lot has happened in Cummins' electrification efforts since AEOS was unveiled in August of 2017, including several acquisitions designed to help the company innovate for its customers.

ELECTRIFICATION

Cummins' new Electrified Power business is quickly getting up to speed, but you’d expect that from a company that has been working with electrified power in various forms like diesel-electric engines for more than a decade. Cummins has pledged to have an all-electric powertrain for the urban bus market by 2019, and off-highway applications following at a later date.

The company thinks electrified power makes the most sense in cities where it believes the infrastructure will develop first for tasks like charging batteries. Technology is changing quickly. Batteries are coming down in price and able to store more power. But it will still be a while before it make sense to go all-electric for heavy loads transported over long distances.

Cummins has taken several steps to ensure it will be the market leader in electrification in the years to come. Most recently the company purchased Silicon Valley-based Efficient Drivetrains, Inc., a U.S. company that designs and produces hybrid and fully-electric power solutions for commercial markets. Within the past nine months, Cummins also acquired U.K.-based Johnson Matthey, an automotive battery business, and North American-based Brammo, which designs and develops battery packs for mobile and stationary applications.

A truck  at Fair Oaks Farms
Trucks from the Fair Oaks Farms in northwest Indiana use natural gas to deliver milk across the midwestern United States. The tankers run on renewable natural gas made by processing manure from the farms' dairy cows.

NATURAL GAS

While electrification and clean diesel each have their advantages, it’s hard to beat the environmental benefits achieved when renewable natural gas is used with the latest Cummins Westport technology to achieve near-zero emissions.

Renewable natural gas can be hard to find, but Fair Oaks Farms in northwest Indiana has plenty. The dairy has been capturing the methane produced by its more than 30,000 cows for some time now. The milk generated by Fair Oaks is delivered to dairies around the Midwest using Cummins Westport natural gas engines and renewable natural gas generated by the farm.

Cummins Westport last year introduced natural gas engines that can achieve emissions levels 90 percent below Environmental Protection Agency standards for NOx. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) is pairing these new engines with renewable natural gas from a vendor who collects it from landfills and treatment sources in California. The combination will make the system’s buses among the cleanest of any major city in the world.

 

Boats, trains or trucks. Clean diesel, electrification or natural gas. Cummins has the expertise to help government officials make the best decision for their particular circumstances. To learn more, check out the company's new website devoted to the trust fund.

 

 

 

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Cummins Rates High on Forbes Magazine’s Rankings of Top Employers

Cummins works hard to establish a welcoming environment, enabling employees to bring their whole self to their job.
Cummins works hard to establish a welcoming environment, enabling employees to bring their whole self to their job.

Cummins has had a strong year on Forbes’ best employer rankings in 2018, finishing No. 49 on the magazine’s list of America’s Best Employers for Women, No. 62 on its list of America’s Best Employers for Diversity and No. 132 on its list of America’s Best Employers 

The rankings reflect the company’s commitment to offering a welcoming work environment where employees get the support and feedback they need for a meaningful and rewarding career.

Forbes announced its best employers for women list last month. The magazine partnered with Statista, a market research company, which surveyed 40,000 Americans, including 25,000 women, working for businesses with at least 1,000 employees. All survey respondents spoke anonymously, allowing participants to share their opinions openly.

Survey respondents were asked about such things as working conditions, diversity and whether they would recommend their employers to others. The final list ranks the 300 employers that received the most recommendations and had gender diversity in their boards of directors and executive ranks.

The magazine also worked with Statista to produce its list of America’s Best Employers for Diversity, which was released in January. Using a similar methodology, researchers asked about diversity, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age and disabilities, giving greater weight to the answers from diverse employees. It included in the ranking diversity within a company’s management team and board and whether the company regularly communicates about diversity.

Cummins' employees at the 2018 Pride Parade in Indianapolis
Cummins' employees show their support for diversity at the 2018 Pride Parade in Indianapolis, Indiana (USA).

Forbes again worked with Statista to produce its list of America’s Best Employers released in May. Cummins finished No. 132 in the magazine’s ranking, which divides its list into two categories: large companies with more than 5,000 employees and midsize companies with 1,000 to 5,000 employees. In each category, 500 companies were named to the list. Cummins was in the large company category.

The employees surveyed were asked to rate on a 0 to 10 scale how likely they would be to recommend their employer to others. They were then asked to nominate organizations in industries outside their own. Employers were ranked based on the number of recommendations they received.

Diversity and inclusion, caring and teamwork are three of the company’s five official values (excellence and integrity are the other two). Cummins believes strongly that diverse teams of people, working collaboratively, are more likely to reach creative solutions to customers’ challenges.

In 2017 Cummins also finished 45th on the Forbes and JUST Capital’s Just 100, a list of America’s best corporate citizens. The Just 100 ranks the largest publicly traded U.S. corporations on a number of issues deemed through polling as the most important to Americans.

Cummins' employees on a community work project in Columbus, Indiana.
Cummins' employees work on a community beautification project in the company's headquarters city of Columbus, Indiana (U.S.A.). All Cummins employees have the opportunity to work on community projects for four hours on company time, and longer with the approval of their supervisor.


 

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Favorable Winds Behind Cummins Strategy to Expand Low Carbon Energy

Visitors to the Meadow Lake Wind Farm in northwest Indiana look at one of the first wind turbines to go up at an expansion Cummins is supporting through a Virtual Power Purchase Agreement. When complete in early 2019, the expansion will include more than 50 wind turbines and a capital investment of about $340 million.
Visitors to the Meadow Lake Wind Farm in northwest Indiana look at one of the first wind turbines to go up at an expansion Cummins is supporting through a Virtual Power Purchase Agreement. When complete in early 2019, the expansion will include more than 50 wind turbines and a capital investment of about $340 million.

Cummins’ environmental officials celebrated American Wind Week in a big way Tuesday, touring the beginning of construction of the Meadow Lake VI wind farm in northwest Indiana (USA). The company is supporting the expansion through a financial arrangement known as a Virtual Power Purchase Agreement (VPPA).

The first turbine towers and blades are beginning to go up some 500 feet into the air, although the potential for storms and windy conditions precluded any lifting Tuesday by the two giant cranes on the construction site. Cummins is supporting the wind farm expansion as part of its goal to encourage the development of low carbon energy.

“We’ve been working to make this project happen with EDP Renewables for two years now and it’s finally coming to fruition,” said Mark Dhennin, Cummins’ Director of Energy and Environment, speaking at a small gathering of invited guests and state and local officials at the wind farm. Representatives from Mortenson, the project manager, and Vestas, the manufacturer of the turbines, also attended the event.

 “This is a big moment for us," Dhennin added. "This is a huge part of our energy sustainability plan at Cummins and it was really important to do it right, with the right project, in the right location, with the right developer.”

Cummins Mark Dhennin
Director of Energy and Environment Mark Dhennin speaks to a local television station at the event Tuesday marking American Wind Week, Aug. 5 to Aug. 11.

The Meadow Lake VI expansion will eventually generate about 200 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy, enough electricity to power about 52,000 Indiana homes. Cummins’ support covers about 75 MW. Nestle and the Wabash Valley Power Association are also purchasing energy generated by Meadow Lake VI.

The first phase at Meadow Lake was built in 2009. With the completion of Meadow Lake VI in early 2019, the capacity of all six phases will exceed 800 MW, making it the largest wind energy project in the state with enough capacity to power more than 200,000 Indiana homes.

The electricity generated by Cummins’ share of the expansion is roughly equivalent to all of the power used at Cummins’ facilities in Indiana and about 50 percent of the electricity consumption at the company’s U.S. facilities. However, the power will go to the grid and not directly to Cummins. That’s where the VPPA comes in.

Wind week proclamation
Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb issued a proclamation celebrating American Wind Week. Indiana is the 12th largest producer of wind energy in the U.S. The proclamation was read by State Sen. Brian Buchanan, who represents the area.

Under Cummins’ 15-year agreement with EDP, it guarantees the wind farm a fixed price for its share of the electricity Meadow Lake VI generates, providing some certainty that helped the expansion move forward. Cummins benefits in that the VPPA provides a hedge of sorts against rising energy prices – the company pays or receives the difference between the contract price and the market price of energy. Cummins also receives something called renewable energy certificates (RECs) to demonstrate its greenhouse gas reduction efforts.

Dhennin said EDP’s expertise and strong relationship with state and local officials as well as landowners was critical to the partnership.

“The developer we found through extensive interviews and evaluations has the same values that Cummins has,” he said. “They care about the community, they are responsive to landowner concerns and that was a huge concern to Cummins.”

Kelly Snyder, EDP Renewables Senior Origination Manager, said EDP has a strong team and Meadow Lake is an excellent site for a wind farm. The area is primarily agricultural, which co-exists nicely with harvesting power from wind.

“EDP Renewables is also pleased to partner with Cummins to help in meeting its admirable sustainability goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” Snyder said.

 

Truck drives by a turbine at Meadow Lake
Expanding the production of low-carbon forms of energy is one of Cummins’ environmental goals.

TO LEARN MORE

To learn more about Cummins' strategy to promote the development of low carbon energy through wind, look for a case study to be posted soon by the Rocky Mountain Institute, a member-based group that works to streamline and accelerate corporate procurement of off-site, utility-scale wind and solar energy.

 

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Redirecting to
cummins.com

The information you are looking for is on
cummins.com

We are launching that site for you now.

Thank you.