Cummins Turns Landfill Gas Into Power for Delaware Customers

Dignitaries including Delaware Gov. Jack A. Markell attended a ground breaking ceremony this summer for an innovative energy solution at Croda Inc. in Delaware featuring Cummins’ combined heat and power systems running on landfill gas.

Construction started earlier this summer on a first of its kind project for Cummins that will use landfill gas and the Company’s combined heat and power (CHP) systems to provide industrial customers in Delaware with a clean, sustainable source of energy.

The first recipient will be Croda Inc.’s Atlas Point chemical manufacturing plant in New Castle, Del. Croda, a global company with operations in 33 countries, estimates the project will provide enough energy to cover about 55 percent of its operations at Atlas Point.

Over the next two years, the City of Wilmington’s Wastewater Treatment Plant and the Port of Wilmington will join the system, also using Cummins’ combined heat and power systems running on landfill gas.

“Croda has a global goal to obtain 25 percent of its energy needs from non-fossil sources by 2015 and we are excited that this venture will help us achieve that goal,” said Croda Inc. President Kevin Gallagher, who estimates Croda’s investment will pay for itself in five or six years.

The project has gotten the attention of Delaware Gov. Jack A. Markell. He applauded Croda at a groundbreaking ceremony for the $6 million project on June 7 (2012).

“This project saves energy costs for a company that has chosen to locate here while putting more people to work,” Markell said. “We applaud Croda’s investment in Delaware, both environmentally and economically.”

Don Gesick, Cummins’ General Manager – Energy Solutions, said Cummins is excited to take a leadership role in providing Croda and its other customers with a “comprehensive, efficient and green solution.”

“Instead of the landfill gas being flared into the atmosphere, this system brings the gas directly to Croda and our other partners, reducing emissions,” he added. “The CHP system then allows for maximum productive use of the renewable energy.”

Construction on the Croda project started in June and is expected to wrap up sometime in the fall of 2012. Croda estimates the initiative will replace 2.2 megawatts of utility-supplied electricity, reducing annual greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing 33,000 passenger cars from the road.

The wastewater treatment plant project, part of an overall city Sustainable Energy Initiative costing $50.5 million, will be even bigger. The city expects to produce 4.4 megawatts of energy – essentially enough power to take the plant off the grid if officials wanted.

The Port of Wilmington is looking for a system to generate about 2 megawatts of power to help meet its overall power needs.

While it’s fairly common for landfills to use the gas they generate to power aspects of their operations or create energy that they then sell to a utility, rarely is the gas pumped off site to meet the energy needs of multiple companies and agencies. The use of CHP systems to get the most of the energy produced makes this initiative even more unusual.

Here’s how the project works: Cummins Power Generation obtained the right to use the landfill gas from the Delaware Solid Waste

Authority, which runs the 500-acre Cherry Island Landfill. The gas is currently being released by means of a flare to keep it from building up in the landfill.

More than 50 percent of landfill materials are organics and suitable for anaerobic digestion that yields biogas, typically about 50 percent methane. Gas-powered generator sets and on-site power plants can be designed to run on gas with low or variable energy content.

When the Delaware project is up and running, the gas will be collected and conditioned at the landfill, then piped to Croda and the other customers. The Croda plant is about four miles from the landfill.

Once it reaches its destination, the gas will fuel a Cummins CHP system that will produce electricity while also capturing the heat from generators that otherwise would be lost. Up to 85 percent of the available energy output with a combined heat and power system can be used productively.

The heat captured at Croda will be used in the facility’s boiler system. At the treatment plant, officials plan to use the heat to dry sludge, significantly reducing the volume that then has to be taken to an out-of-state landfill for disposal. The port plans to convert the heat captured by the combined heat and power system to run chillers to cool warehouses used for items like fruits and vegetables.

The solid waste authority says the landfill will generate enough gas for the system for at least 20 years and perhaps twice that long.
Gesick says every landfill situation is a little bit different so he’s not sure if the Cherry Island project will be a model for other customers looking to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. Unlike many landfills, for example, Cherry Island is relatively close to potential customers. Often landfills are located in remote areas.

The Delaware project, however, is an example of the kind of innovative arrangement Cummins Power Generation can develop to meet customers’ needs.

In addition to industry leading generators and CHP systems, Cummins Power Generation offers financing, operations and maintenance programs. It even builds turnkey power systems, handling everything from design to installation and commissioning.

The Cherry Island project received high praise from Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Collin O’Mara.

“Croda should be commended for deploying one of the cleanest and most efficient energy projects in the nation,” he said at the groundbreaking.

“This project demonstrates innovation and environmental commitment by taking a readily available waste product that previously served no productive purpose – in this case landfill gas – and putting it to work making cleaner and more efficient energy while reducing emissions and fossil fuel dependence.”

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

Cummins Powers Women Program Celebrates International Day of the Girl

Participants in Rise Up’s Girls’ Voices Initiative in Kenya learn how to develop their own strategies to improve girls’ lives.
Participants in Rise Up’s Girls’ Voices Initiative in Kenya learn how to develop their own strategies to improve girls’ lives.

Women and girls are half the world’s population. When women and girls advance, we all move forward. The Masai ethnic group in central and southern Kenya are pastoralists, moving to and from areas raising livestock. Their society is strongly patriarchal; male elders decide most major matters for each Masai group. But Cummins Powers Women partner Rise Up is working to change this.

Rise Up’s Girls’ Voices Initiative (GVI) enables Kenyan girls to learn about girl-centered advocacy, leadership and how to develop their own strategies to improve girls’ lives. Rise Up is one of eight non-profit organizations Cummins is partnering with through the global Cummins Powers Women program, Cummins’ commitment to the advancement and prosperity of women and girls around the world. 

Peris is a 14-year-old Masai girl with a mighty voice, advocating to keep Kenyan girls in school. She is one of 24 girls participating in the GVI to stand up for change. Together these girl leaders are advocating for legislation to bring an end to female genital mutilation (FGM) in Kenya.

Peris, a participant in the Girls' Voices Initiative.
Peris, a participant in Rise Up's Girls' Voices Initiative.

“I was inspired to work on issues affecting girls in my community because girls have been undergoing many problems, including FGM, early marriage, teen pregnancies and dropping out of school,” Peris explained.

“I attended the training and learned that a girl was not put on this earth to be invisible and not given life only to belong to someone else," she said. "I learned that girls can also be confident in their future and focus forward as the boys can do. I learned that I can speak up for girls’ rights.”


   
GLOBAL REALITIES FOR GIRLS

Today, on International Day of the Girl (Oct. 11), Cummins celebrates young female leaders like Peris, who are working to change their current reality. Consider these facts :

•    Globally, nearly 15 million girls under age 18 are married every year – or 37,000 each day.
•    One in three girls aged 15-19 has experienced some form of female genital mutilation in the 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East.
•    600 million girls live in poverty.
•    Every additional year of schooling for a girl increases her future earnings by 10 to 20 percent.

Although Kenya’s Female Genital Mutilation Act (2011) prohibits FGM nationwide, the practice remains common in certain regions. The prevalence of FGM in Peris’ community of Kajiado County is among the highest in the nation, affecting about 73 percent of women and girls (KDHS, 2014). 

Thanks to the training they received from Rise Up, Peris and her fellow girl leaders advocated for their rights. Together, they asked for support from the school chairmen, teachers and boys, and within their community, speaking with key chiefs and village elders.

Their leadership and advocacy resulted in the Members of the County Assembly implementing the FGM Act in Kajiado County. This is exponential change, and that’s why Cummins is partnering with Rise Up and other organizations advocating for women’s advancement around the world. 

PARTNERSHIPS THAT WORK

When women and girls have equal opportunity for education, skills development, pay, child care and healthcare, then girls, women, families and ultimately economies prosper. 

The Cummins Powers Women program represents the next phase of Cummins’ commitment to large-scale community impact and powering a more prosperous world. The program has started projects in seven regions around the world, reaching more than 1,500 people in 10 countries. 

The company’s investment of more than $10 million will support a range of effective programs already underway:

•    In North America, the Cummins Leadership Team is helping Girls Inc. create an advocacy approach to influence policy and government support for legislation that help girls and young women.
•    In Australia, local Cummins leaders met with students at Girls Academy schools to learn about their interests and goals. Girls Academy is the leading provider of school based programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls in Australia.
•    In Cambodia, local Cummins leaders joined program partner CARE Australia in meeting young female students at two local schools to learn about their day to day lives. CARE is working to improve girls’ education in the northern provinces of Cambodia. Cummins and CARE also met with government officials to discuss the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) skills development in school curriculum. 
•    In Kenya, Cummins' leaders will be engaging in the Rise Up leadership accelerator in November, focused on young Maasai women. The program will engage 20 high school girls and 10 of their teachers, helping the girls develop their voice for advocacy and training the teachers on how to support the students.

The positive and inclusive environment for women at Cummins is the catalyst for us to dream about a future for all women and girls that includes abundant opportunity for global leadership, invention, skill and creativity. That’s why Cummins is lending its powerful voice in communities to cause exponential change in the lives of women and girls. 

Mary Chandler - Cummins Inc.

Mary T. Chandler

Mary Titsworth Chandler is Vice President of Corporate Responsibility and Chief Executive Officer of the Cummins Foundation. She joined the company in 2011 serving in Corporate Responsibility and became the leader of the function in 2015. A lawyer by training, Chandler practiced law for 25 years prior to working at Cummins.

Cummins Named to Key Sustainability Index for a 13th Consecutive Year

Remanufacturing centers like the one in Memphis, Tennessee (USA), return Cummins’ engines and parts to productive use, keeping them out of landfills. In addition, the practice saves the energy needed to build new products.
Remanufacturing centers like the one in Memphis, Tennessee (USA), return Cummins’ engines and parts to productive use, keeping them out of landfills. In addition, the practice saves the energy needed to build new products.

Cummins has been named to the Dow Jones Sustainability North American Index for a 13th consecutive year, missing the minimum score for inclusion on its world index by a single point.

The index is one of the most prestigious sustainability rankings in the world. Participating companies must complete an exhaustive self-assessment supported by publicly available data covering a wide range of areas including the environment, governance, ethics, safety, innovation, customer support, human rights, and philanthropy and community service.

“Sustainability for Cummins is about making sure that we do our business in a more effective and more efficient way,” Chairman and CEO Tom Linebarger said in a recent interview for the Business Roundtable, a group of business leaders dedicated to playing an active role in the formation of public policy. “We want to make sure that as we continue to give power to people around the world, we do it by consuming and impacting the world less.

 

 

“This challenge, meeting the sustainability needs of our planet while continuing to grow our economy, is the challenge of our age,” he added, "and Cummins is facing this head on.”

Cummins’ consistently high ranking in the Dow Jones sustainability index for North America reflects its commitment to sustainability. In 2018, the company saw major gains in the scoring of its answers for human rights (the company adopted a new human rights policy late in 2017) as well for its strategy for emerging markets, operational eco-efficiency and corporate citizenship.

Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones sustainability index is based on an analysis by RobecoSAM, an investment group focused exclusively on sustainability investing for more than 20 years. It says the number of companies submitting surveys for review has consistently grown over time, increasing 5 percent alone in 2018. RobecoSAM says that’s evidence of the growing importance of sustainability as a key investment factor. 

Cummins has also done well in other recent sustainability and environmental surveys and rankings. The company finished 25th in Newsweek’s 2017 Green Ranking of U.S. companies, 45th on the Forbes-Just Capital list of the Just 100: America’s Best Corporate Citizens in 2017 and 60th in Barron’s first-ever list of America’s 100 Most Sustainable Companies, announced earlier this year.

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

New Center is Next Step in Cummins’ Innovation Efforts

Vice President and Chief Technical Officer Jennifer Rumsey leads a tour at the new Cummins Machine Integration Center.
Vice President and Chief Technical Officer Jennifer Rumsey leads a tour at the new Cummins Machine Integration Center.

Cummins officials today (Sept. 18, 2018) dedicated a state-of-the-art integration center designed to test the integration of company products and concepts into customer trucks and other equipment.

The new Cummins Machine Integration Center in Columbus, Indiana (USA), is capable of testing a variety of powertrains, including electrified power, and represents another significant step in the company’s efforts to enhance innovation across a broad portfolio of power options.

“This facility is already a key tool in our toolbox as we work to provide turn-key machine integration solutions for our global customers,” said Jennifer Rumsey, Vice President and Chief Technical Officer at Cummins. “In addition, we can showcase our global integration technology leadership and provide an enhanced workspace for our employees who will have new opportunities to develop their skills and capabilities.”

The new center replaces a crowded facility in Columbus that was retrofitted for the same kind of work. The new center is larger, with room for 60 to 70 trucks on the site, and includes 16 dedicated service bays, a fabrication shop, an instrumentation lab, a parts inventory and a powertrain integration area. Everything is laid out for the greatest possible efficiency, including making it easier to pick up materials for recycling.

The new center has room for 60 or 70 trucks on site and includes 16 dedicated service bays.
The new center has room for 70 trucks on site and has 16 dedicated service bays.

PERFECTLY ALIGNED

The center is perfectly aligned with the company’s goal of offering customers a range of dependable power solutions, including clean diesel, natural gas, and hybrid and fully electric powertrains. It has a dedicated space just for electrification work, with limited access to ensure only those with the appropriate safety training can enter.

The new building also has office space for about 45 employees and plenty of collaborative working space for visiting employees from nearby Cummins facilities who might have business at the center. Finally, the new center has room for expansion as critical technologies are identified and incorporated into Cummins products.

Dedication of Cummins Machine Integration Center
A crowd of elected officials, the media and Cummins employees attended today's dedication and toured the facility.

A BUILDING WITH A PURPOSE

A lot of the center’s work will be dedicated to figuring out the best way to integrate Cummins’ engines and other products into customers’ machines. Cummins is an independent engine manufacturer so a lot of the company’s products are sold to customers who build trucks and other equipment. The company wants to be a partner in its customers’ success so product integration is critical.

But there will also be “real world” testing going on at the center into the concepts the company is exploring for possible use in the future.

Photo from the Cummins Machine Integration Center Opening
It's been a busy year for innovation at Cummins, as the company looks to continue as the industry leader in its field.

A BUSY YEAR FOR INNOVATION

The center is merely the latest step in the company’s innovation efforts over the past year. Cummins acquired several companies to enhance its electrification efforts. It opened a new technical center in India in March and celebrated the 50th anniversary of its technical center in Columbus in October of 2017.
 

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

In NASCAR, this Job is Never Truly Done, but the Hauler Driver can Always Count on Cummins

The hauler containing Clint Bowyer’s No. 14 Ford depends on a Cummins engine to get the NASCAR team to its next race.
The hauler containing Clint Bowyer’s No. 14 Ford depends on a Cummins engine to get the NASCAR team to its next race.

When Bill “Stump” Lewis pulls the hauler containing Clint Bowyer’s No. 14 Ford into the next track on the NASCAR circuit, he knows there’s a pretty good chance he’ll never see the actual race. 

Lewis is usually busy packing the Cummins powered tractor-trailer during a race to get back on the road as quickly as possible after the checkered flag falls.

Every second counts, both on and off the track, for Bowyer’s team, which is sponsored in part by Cummins in 2018. It’s just part of the job, says Lewis, who has been doing this kind of work for more than 20 years. 

“Sometimes I don’t even know who won the race,” he said with a laugh, taking a short break from his duties for Stewart-Haas Racing (SHR) earlier this season at the Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan (USA).

It’s OK, the affable Lewis says, driving the truck is still one of his favorite parts of the job.

FIRST IN, LAST OUT

Hauler drivers are typically the first to arrive at a track for a NASCAR team and often the last to leave. Some say they have the toughest job on the circuit and that’s easy to understand listening to Lewis describe his typical week during the season.

It starts at the SHR garage in Kannapolis, North Carolina (USA), where Lewis gets everything loaded into the hauler – including two cars, nearly enough parts to build another, tools of all sort, and the electronic equipment used to evaluate a car’s performance on the track. Lewis is even in charge of the snacks served in the team break room inside the hauler – which usually means he makes a trip to the grocery store before leaving town.

By the time the hauler hits the road, it’s filled either at or near the legal limit – 80,000 pounds. When he gets to the track, Lewis’ work is just beginning. He gets everything out and positioned, so the crew can get right to work the minute they arrive on site. Even at 66, Lewis can run circles around many of his younger peers on the NASCAR circuit.

Rendering of Cummins car for key races
For select races, the Cummins logo will appear on the hood of Clint Bowyer’s No. 14 Ford for Stewart-Haas racing.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HAULER

It’s a tough job, agrees Gary “Bear” Geissman, who is the fleet manager for SHR and has been involved in the racing transportation business in various capacities for some 40 years. He oversees all of the team’s haulers and 16 to 18 drivers. Sometimes more than one driver is needed if a trip takes more than the legal time limit before a driver must rest.

The SHR team’s haulers are usually on the road for more than 220 days a year, each covering about 70,000 miles annually, crisscrossing the United States under all kinds of driving conditions. There are seldom any “empty miles” that other truck drivers experience heading home after a delivery.

Keeping the haulers clean and in top condition is paramount. First, they each carry about $1.5 million worth of equipment, Geissman said. If that weren’t enough, the haulers amount to rolling billboards for teams and their partners. 

In certain locations, the haulers even have their own rabid fans. After NASCAR’s stop at Watkins Glen International in upstate New York, Lewis said people were lined up for miles on the sides of the road to see the haulers head south into Pennsylvania.

Photo of the Stewart Haas Hauler in Bristol
The Stewart-Haas hauler at the Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tennessee (USA) earlier this year.

THE CUMMINS DIFFERENCE

Nobody wants to get stuck by the side of the road, the drivers of a stock car hauler perhaps least of all. They know a race has never been delayed or cancelled because someone’s hauler had engine trouble getting to the track.

Lewis says torque and dependability are key to getting his job done and Bowyer’s hauler has had a 600-horsepower heavy duty Cummins engine for about three years. 

“We are at maximum load with our trucks,” said Geissman, who’s worked with Cummins engines for most of his career. “With a Cummins engine we get the power we need to pull all of our equipment. We can get up to and stay at the speed limit, and our Cummins engines are really good on fuel, too. ”

Hauler drivers have enough to worry about. They shouldn’t have to worry about their engines, too. 
 

The Cummins’ name debuted on the No. 14 Ford of driver Clint Bowyer at the Aug. 18 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race at Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway. Cummins will return to Bowyer’s car for the Oct. 14 race at Talladega (Ala.) Superspeedway. To follow Bowyer’s efforts, check out the Stewart-Haas Racing website or follow the team’s social media platforms on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

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