Infraestructura de carga: sentar las bases para el futuro de la electrificación

Power comes in many forms. For electric vehicles (EVs), it's electricity. It sounds simple enough but transitioning a fleet to electrified power takes careful planning and a number of considerations in terms of infrastructure.

It's easy to get excited about electrified transportation, but an EV ecosystem goes far beyond just placing an order for new vehicles and dropping a few chargers around town. Large-scale charging systems require robust infrastructure planning in tandem with your community or organization's overall electrification strategy.

Here are five considerations you should make during infrastructure planning, and how to navigate some of the many decisions you’ll face along the way.

Feasibility

While an electrified transportation system is a powerful and effective solution for many cities around the world, fully electrified transit might not be the best choice for every community or every mission just yet.

Technology and infrastructure are advancing rapidly, but some localities may not yet have compatible grid power or electrical infrastructure to support large-scale EV adoption immediately. Even if the grid has enough power to support the electrification at the aggregate level, there can be local limitations and power may not be available at the location it is needed.

Similarly, the duty cycle of the mission can provide additional challenges. Consider conducting a feasibility study to see what the limitations will be, if any, should your town, city, or organization pursue electrified transportation. It can be helpful to get a third-party reality check to make sure your electrified ambitions are achievable with your community's resources.

Even if there are challenges on the path of large-scale electrification, you’ll likely be able to start making infrastructure improvements and create a long-term plan to get your community to where it needs to be to support electrified transportation with some of the following considerations. 

Hardware

One of the first considerations in building out an electrified transportation system is your charging infrastructure - the nuts and bolts delivering power to your EV fleet. This includes the substation, power box, and charging unit. There are a lot of options currently out in the market, and a trusted advisor can help you navigate the many choices you'll have for chargers and other hardware needed.

By examining your fleet, your city's layout, existing infrastructure, and power availability, you'll begin the process of deciding what chargers work best for your electrification strategy. But it goes beyond just selecting what chargers to buy - you'll need to determine where they'll be located, whether vehicles should charge fast or slow, what time vehicles will be charged, and more.

All of these decisions must be taken into consideration when selecting your fleet of EVs as well. Because of the complicated nature of planning, it's helpful to bring on a full-service partner with experience strategizing all elements of your electrification journey - from chargers to vehicles and beyond.

Electric power charging infrastructure - Cummins Inc.

Routes

Route planning is another key aspect of infrastructure consideration for adopting an electric fleet. Not only do you need to decide if and where chargers will be placed along routes (as opposed to only in a charging depot), but where your electric vehicles will drive.

Though EV range is rapidly improving, transit authorities and city planners must accommodate for the potentially limited range of EVs compared to that of vehicles powered by an internal combustion engine (ICE). But this can rapidly become a chicken-and-the-egg situation: Should you purchase your fleet based on your route requirements, or should you adjust your route requirements based on your chosen vehicles?

Oftentimes, it's a bit of both. That's why route planning can be so complicated, and often requires an outside expert familiar with many vehicle models and their performance. It's important to select a trusted manufacturer with a proven history of reliability, so your fleet can perform at its projected range and keep planned routes on track.

Grid power

A locality's grid power puts the E in EV. To power an electric fleet, you need sufficient and reliable electricity. When planning your electrification infrastructure, evaluate the grid power and determine what kind of chargers and the quantity of EVs they can support - and when and where. The grid power your fleet will need will depend on the size of the battery in the vehicle, the energy requirement for the next day's mission, and the available time for the charging event.

Charging times can have a major impact on the overall cost of charging and will influence infrastructure design route planning as well. It may work best to charge your entire fleet overnight in a depot, or your grid power may better support staggered charging throughout the day, either in a depot or on route. Additionally, alternative charging strategies such as the use of microgrids can help reduce the amount of grid power required, and therefore the cost - though they also come with higher initial costs.

Strategic planning

One of the most complicated aspects of planning for the transition to electrified power is that many of these decisions must happen in tandem with one another. Electrification isn't a linear process, and it's important to find a trusted partner well versed in all areas of consideration, as planning and implementation both are lengthy investments in terms of time and finances.

Cummins is working to explore electrification advisory services in the near future, so we can meet the growing needs of those interested in exploring electrification. From feasibility to planning, and all the way to purchasing and installing chargers, we're looking forward to helping our customers and communities navigate all aspects of the journey to electrification.

As a supplier of diverse powertrain systems, Cummins looks forward to helping customers best plan for a future that includes electrified power. Over the past 100 years, we've partnered with customers around the world to find the power solutions that work for them.

 
Edificio de oficinas de Cummins

Cummins Inc.

Cummins es un líder mundial en energía que diseña, fabrica, vende y ofrece servicios de diésel y motores de combustible alternativo de 2,8 a 95 litros, diésel y grupos electrógenos eléctricos con combustibles alternativos de 2,5 a 3, 500 kW, además de componentes y tecnología relacionados. Cummins atiende a sus clientes a través de su red de 600 instalaciones de distribuidores independientes y propiedad de la compañía y más de 7, 200 centros de distribuidores en más de 190 países y territorios.

Impulsado por Cummins: XCMG Electric excavadora hace su hermoso debut

Excavadora eléctrica Cummins

Al mirar para describir nuestras aplicaciones de energía electrizada, muchos adjetivos vienen a la mente, incluyendo duradero, confiable, seguro, y... ¿Hermosa? Es un nuevo (e inusual!) que agregar a la lista, pero esta primavera, la recién estrenada excavadora eléctrica XCMG impulsada por Cummins agregó "la más hermosa" a su lista de atributos. Siga leyendo para obtener más información. excavadora eléctrica

Cummins colaboró con XCMG, la 4ª compañía de maquinaria de construcción más grande del mundo, para diseñar y construir la excavadora eléctrica de 3,5 toneladas, que servirá como un demostrador tecnológico. A menudo operando en sitios de trabajo en ciudades y pueblos densamente poblados de todo el mundo, los equipos de construcción deben cumplir con los requisitos de emisiones más estrictos y mantener el ruido y la interrupción al mínimo a la vez que se hace el trabajo. La nueva excavadora eléctrica es apta para condiciones de trabajo que requieren normas ambientales más estrictas y reducciones de ruido.

Alimentado por los módulos de batería de Cummins BM 5.7 E, la excavadora tiene 45 kWh de energía de la batería. Cada módulo de batería está diseñado para una capacidad de choque y vibración muy alta para soportar las duras condiciones del entorno de la construcción. La coincidencia precisa entre el motor y el sistema hidráulico crea un sistema de transmisión eficiente, confiable y silencioso, lo que lo hace ideal para su uso en la construcción urbana y suburbana.

Con una sola carga de menos de seis horas, la excavadora cumple con las necesidades operativas para un turno completo de 8 horas. El tiempo de carga corta significa que el equipo se puede cargar durante la noche, eliminando el tiempo de inactividad y aprovechando el ahorro de energía fuera de su apogeo.

Construcción y colaboración

El pasado mes de octubre, Cummins y XCMG consolidaron su larga relación al firmar un acuerdo de cooperación estratégica. El acuerdo garantiza una estrecha colaboración en el desarrollo e integración de líneas de productos integrales, cadena de valor y operaciones globales, la creación de nuevas aplicaciones, la exploración de nuevos mercados y el intercambio de recursos sobre investigación y desarrollo para la mejora continua.

Acuerdo de XCMG
En octubre de 2019, Cummins y XCMG cimentaron su relación de larga data.

Espejo, espejo en la pared...

Excavadora XCMGLa excavadora eléctrica XCMG impulsada por Cummins hizo su debut en el ConExpo de este año, la exhibición de construcción más grande de Norteamérica celebrada en las Vegas, Nevada. La excavadora ganó su descriptor como "hermoso" porque ganó el premio a la máquina más hermosa en ConExpo! Superando a algunos duros contendientes en el primer puesto, la excavadora fue elegida como la más bella de todas, y no podíamos estar más de acuerdo.

Luego de su victoria en las Vegas, la excavadora está ahora de vuelta en China, donde se usará en una serie de pruebas de rendimiento y clientes llevadas a cabo por Cummins y XCMG, para probar la capacidad del demostrador y perfeccionar una solución robusta para el mercado.

Edificio de oficinas de Cummins

Cummins Inc.

Cummins es un líder mundial en energía que diseña, fabrica, vende y ofrece servicios de diésel y motores de combustible alternativo de 2,8 a 95 litros, diésel y grupos electrógenos eléctricos con combustibles alternativos de 2,5 a 3, 500 kW, además de componentes y tecnología relacionados. Cummins atiende a sus clientes a través de su red de 600 instalaciones de distribuidores independientes y propiedad de la compañía y más de 7, 200 centros de distribuidores en más de 190 países y territorios.

Confiable porque está probado: el autobús eléctrico de batería GILLIG con motor Cummins

Autobús eléctrico de batería GILLIG con motor Cummins

Confiable porque está probado.

¿Qué tienen en común las bolsas de arena, las montañas, un Dron y un equipo de filmación? Bueno, no mucho, excepto que todos fueron una parte importante del esfuerzo de GILLIG y Cummins por ilustrar el alcance del proceso de prueba y validación para el autobús eléctrico de batería GILLIG con motor Cummins.

Desde 2017 cuando Cummins y GILLIG anunciaron la sociedad para trabajar juntos en el desarrollo de un tren motriz eléctrico líder en la industria, ambas organizaciones han trabajado diligentemente para diseñar, probar y validar nuestra oferta. Esto no es tarea fácil, pero uno que ayuda a distinguirnos de la competencia. A medida que aportamos nuevas tecnologías, lo hacemos con el mismo compromiso con los clientes de calidad que han llegado a esperar. ¿Pero cómo?

No he fallado. Acabo de encontrar 10, 000 maneras que no funcionan. " -Thomas Edison

Pruebas y validación

Una pieza fundamental para sacar A la luz las mejores soluciones de su clase es el compromiso de Cummins de probar y validar nuestras ofertas con respecto a las necesidades del cliente. Para nuestro sistema de baterías eléctricas (BES), esto significa validar los productos en un nivel de componente (por ej., las baterías de BP74E exclusivas de Cummins), un nivel de tren motriz y, aún más ampliamente, trabajar con GILLIG para probar el desempeño del autobús general.

En última instancia, como la mayoría de los estudiantes que toman una prueba, queremos aprobar. Pero, tal como observó Thomas Edison, la capacidad de innovar no sería completa sin pequeños fracasos en el camino. Las pruebas y no tener éxito también son fundamentales para el proceso. Las pruebas con fallas brindan información sobre los límites actuales de un producto para que se puedan ajustar los diseños y optimizar el desempeño para cumplir con los muchos escenarios diferentes que nuestros clientes verán en su trabajo diario. Estaríamos fallando a nuestros clientes sin unos pocos fracasos en el camino.

Condiciones del mundo real

GILLIG y Cummins también se enorgullecen de validar nuestros productos en escenarios de mundo real, no solo en condiciones ideales. Con este fin, que se ilustró recientemente en la prueba de gradabilidad para el autobús GILLIG, se realizaron varias pruebas en el autobús ya que se cargaban con sacos de arena para simular el peso de los pasajeros. Un tren motriz que puede funcionar de manera eficiente, pero solo puede hacerlo vacío, no tiene valor alguno para una comunidad que busca transportar gente todo el día, todos los días.

De la misma manera, trabajamos estrechamente con clientes de prueba de campo para refinar soluciones y ofrecer un producto confiable y de confianza. Big Blue Bus en Santa Mónica, quien recibió el primer autobús de prueba de campo en julio de 2019, ha sido un socio fundamental para brindar retroalimentación utilizando rutas reales y escenarios operativos diarios. Trabajar con clientes valiosos y usuarios finales para identificar oportunidades que se pueden mejorar es crucial. La colaboración y la sociedad que brindan los clientes de prueba de campo nos permite ofrecer un producto que satisfaga y supere las expectativas de los clientes. Afortunadamente, la prueba de campo ha salido bien, y como testimonio de que Big Blue Bus anunció que comprarán 18 autobuses eléctricos adicionales .

Confianza: un compromiso que tomamos en serio

Por lo tanto, la próxima vez que suba por una montaña o simplemente viaje por su ciudad, y vea un autobús eléctrico de batería GILLIG con motor Cummins, puede estar seguro de que ha sido a través de un extenso proceso de pruebas para garantizar la seguridad y confiabilidad. Nuestros clientes y comunidades confían en nosotros, y eso es algo que no tomamos a la ligera.

Edificio de oficinas de Cummins

Cummins Inc.

Cummins es un líder mundial en energía que diseña, fabrica, vende y ofrece servicios de diésel y motores de combustible alternativo de 2,8 a 95 litros, diésel y grupos electrógenos eléctricos con combustibles alternativos de 2,5 a 3, 500 kW, además de componentes y tecnología relacionados. Cummins atiende a sus clientes a través de su red de 600 instalaciones de distribuidores independientes y propiedad de la compañía y más de 7, 200 centros de distribuidores en más de 190 países y territorios.

El futuro de las flotas: las cuatro claves de la electrificación-parte 4

Futuro de las flotas cero emisiones

Cuando se trata de vehículos eléctricos de la batería, hay cuatro claves para la adopción dentro del sector del vehículo comercial. En la parte 4 de nuestra serie de blogs de cuatro partes , nos fijamos en el obstáculo final que debe superar una nueva tecnología: políticas y regulaciones.

En este cuarto blog de vista previa, nos fijamos en cómo las políticas y regulaciones sobre EVs comerciales deben ser cuidadosamente desarrolladas en colaboración con industrias e instituciones. La sostenibilidad, después de todo, no es un problema limitado a un solo sector, y solo aprovechando la visión de los expertos en la tecnología, la infraestructura y la economía de EVs, así como de los usuarios finales y otros encargados de formular políticas, se diseñarán incentivos exitosos para la adopción.

Si está leyendo esta serie por primera vez, puede encontrar parte uno aquí , la parte dos aquí y la tercera parte aquí.

Garantía regulatoria

Encontrar el enfoque adecuado requerirá una conversación continua, consultas y colaboración con las partes interesadas de todo el espacio de movilidad. La variedad de rutas aquí es amplia: los objetivos de contaminación cero a largo plazo estableceran la dirección general de los viajes para la industria; los grupos de trabajo entre industrias establecerán estándares tecnológicos probados; las políticas que financian y eliminan las barreras para el lanzamiento de infraestructura crearán progresos en cuanto a la usabilidad; las estipulaciones de sostenibilidad en los contratos que se ponen a licitación demostrarán viabilidad económica y crearán un mercado para vehículos sostenibles; el trabajo colaborativo en el intercambio de datos mejorará el monitoreo y la eficiencia; y vincular las tasas de impuestos con las emisiones mejorará la rentabilidad de la inversión.

Si bien la variedad de opciones es desalentadora, ya hay ejemplos de las mejores prácticas que surgen en todo el mundo. Un informe reciente del grupo de investigación ambiental Bellona, por ejemplo, detalla la naturaleza de algunas iniciativas de política que ya están viendo resultados positivos en la construcción, que actualmente representa el 23% de las emisiones de dióxido de carbono (CO2) a nivel mundial.

En la capital Noruega de Oslo, por ejemplo, el promotor municipal de la ciudad ha operado una serie de iniciativas que implican establecer normas mínimas para los licitantes en los contratos que pone a licitación. El desarrollador adoptó la política de que "lo que se puede ejecutar en electricidad, se ejecutará en electricidad", lo que crea el potencial de un mercado para equipos de construcción electrizada. Mirando hacia el futuro, la ciudad anticipa que por 2025 todos los sitios de construcción pública operarán maquinaria y transporte libres de emisiones.

Parte del éxito de la iniciativa de Oslo, además de la determinación de las partes interesadas de hacerlo funcionar, puede estar en el fraseo de su política. Al usar el fraseo "lo que puede funcionar en electricidad", la ciudad evita obligar a las empresas de construcción a adoptar una adopción inadecuada (como electrizar lo que aún no es apto para electrizar) y abre un diálogo con ellos sobre lo que puede y no puede ser electrificado, trabajando de manera cooperativa en el progreso hacia la sostenibilidad.

Juntar todo

En todo el mundo, se están realizando progresos a través del trabajo arduo para llevar las capacidades tecnológicas de EVs hasta el nivel en el que cumplen con los requisitos de las aplicaciones comerciales.

Esto nos obliga a entender sus requisitos de infraestructura y hacerlos claramente accionables, a fin de que su costo total de propiedad baje a un nivel en el que compitan con los vehículos convencionales y los supere, y que produzca una política que incentiva su adopción.

Para Cummins, el proceso de encontrar la solución correcta siempre es un esfuerzo colaborativo. Hacer lo correcto significa tener conversaciones entre las partes interesadas de la industria y las políticas, así como los usuarios finales, para comprender profundamente los problemas y garantizar un despliegue exitoso.

Para obtener más información, visite nuestro "Future of flotas ' whitepaper , que examina las cuatro claves de la electrificación, con información de una amplia variedad de expertos en la industria, entre los que se incluyen Addison Lee , DG: Cities y Nuvve.
 

Descargue el informe "Future of flotas" (PDF)

Edificio de oficinas de Cummins

Cummins Inc.

Cummins es un líder mundial en energía que diseña, fabrica, vende y ofrece servicios de diésel y motores de combustible alternativo de 2,8 a 95 litros, diésel y grupos electrógenos eléctricos con combustibles alternativos de 2,5 a 3, 500 kW, además de componentes y tecnología relacionados. Cummins atiende a sus clientes a través de su red de 600 instalaciones de distribuidores independientes y propiedad de la compañía y más de 7, 200 centros de distribuidores en más de 190 países y territorios.

El futuro de las flotas: las cuatro claves de la electrificación-parte 3

Energía electrizada-futuro de las flotas-realidad económica BP 3

Cuando se trata de vehículos eléctricos de la batería, hay cuatro claves para la adopción dentro del sector del vehículo comercial. En la parte 3 de nuestra serie de blogs de cuatro partes , nos fijamos en el tercer obstáculo que debe superar una nueva tecnología: la viabilidad económica.

 

En la actualidad, los EVs suelen ser más caros que sus equivalentes con motores convencionalmente. Una razón de esto son los costos de material inherentes, con la fabricación de baterías que requieren grandes cantidades de litio. Sin embargo, a medida que se refinan los procesos, se encuentran eficiencias y aumentos de escala, se espera que los costos de fabricación de las baterías de iones de litio (Li-ion) reduzcan, y la reducción de este costo será un gran activador para la adopción de vehículos eléctricos comerciales tempranos (EVs).

En esta tercera parte de la serie " Future of flotas " informes Preview, nos fijamos en las consideraciones económicas para la electrificación. Si está leyendo esta serie por primera vez, puede encontrar parte uno aquí y la parte dos aquí.

Realidad económica

Hoy en día, la toma de decisiones económicas involucradas en la compra de vehículos comerciales es familiar para cualquier persona involucrada en la gestión de flotas. Se puede dividir en términos generales en gastos de capital (el costo por adelantado del vehículo y la infraestructura), los gastos operativos y los costos diarios de funcionamiento del vehículo, como los requisitos de combustible y mantenimiento.

La adopción de EV puede implicar un desembolso significativo, que varía ampliamente dependiendo de la aplicación. Si bien la creciente disponibilidad de los puntos de carga en la calle se puede aprovechar para algunas flotas de vehículos comerciales, como camionetas de entrega de última milla, para otras aplicaciones, como autobuses, es necesaria una infraestructura propiedad. Las nuevas flotas eléctricas, de hecho, pueden exigir configuraciones completamente nuevas de edificios. Sin embargo, los puntos de carga se pueden compartir, lo que significa que el costo inicial se puede reducir. De esta manera, los grandes proyectos de electrificación pueden ofrecer un mejor retorno de la inversión que los proyectos más pequeños.

Desde una perspectiva operativa, las dos áreas de costos principales son la energía y el mantenimiento. Los costos de energía para EVs dependen de los precios de la electricidad, por lo tanto los costos de combustible en la actualidad dependen en última instancia de los precios del petróleo. Los costos de mantenimiento pueden reducirse al mínimo mediante el uso de telemáticas para monitorear el desgaste y predecir con precisión cuándo se requiere mantenimiento.

Si bien los grandes gastos de capital están claramente involucrados, a través de una combinación de precios que caen con el tiempo y ahorros en la eficiencia de los vehículos que comparten puntos de carga, el EVs puede ser, y en el caso de los camiones de reparto, ya son económicamente competitivos con las opciones de diésel.

¿Cómo influye la política y la regulación en la electrificación de los vehículos comerciales? Descubra la serie de blogs "Future of flotas" de la próxima semana.

Descargue el informe "Future of flotas" (PDF)

Edificio de oficinas de Cummins

Cummins Inc.

Cummins es un líder mundial en energía que diseña, fabrica, vende y ofrece servicios de diésel y motores de combustible alternativo de 2,8 a 95 litros, diésel y grupos electrógenos eléctricos con combustibles alternativos de 2,5 a 3, 500 kW, además de componentes y tecnología relacionados. Cummins atiende a sus clientes a través de su red de 600 instalaciones de distribuidores independientes y propiedad de la compañía y más de 7, 200 centros de distribuidores en más de 190 países y territorios.

Redirigiendo a
cummins.com

La información que busca está en
cummins.com

Ahora estamos iniciando ese sitio para usted.

Gracias.